Writing Gay Romances: 4 FAQ (Part 2) by Kelli A Wilkins

Hi everyone,

My name is Kelli A. Wilkins and I write romances in every genre and heat level from mild to super-spicy. When people learn that I write gay romances they usually ask a lot of questions about “why” or “how” I write them.

To celebrate Pride month, I’m sharing four FAQ about writing m/m romances. (In the first part of this blog, I shared four different questions from readers and authors.)

 

#1: You’ve written three contemporary gay romances (A Secret Match, Four Days with Jack, and Killer in Wolf’s Clothing), which one is your favorite and why?

I love all of my romances, in all genres, but my favorite gay romance is A KIWCSecret Match. I love the setting (professional wrestling) and the characters, especially the hero, Everett. He’s a bit of a wiseass and has a crazy sense of humor, but he uses those as a defense to mask his pain. Right from the start of the book Ev is given an ultimatum: come out and be honest about who he really is, or risk losing his longtime lover, Josh.

I also love the book because of the way I wrote it. It’s not told in a traditional manner. Ev is on the road and apart from Josh for almost half the book, and we experience his relationship with Josh through flashbacks and voicemail messages. We see and feel Ev’s isolation and conflicting emotions. We also see Josh getting advice from his friends regarding his “secret” boyfriend. I won’t give away more than that, but the book is an emotional roller coaster ride blended with steamy love scenes and an inside look at the world of professional wrestling.

 

#2: Most of your straight romances have historical settings. Do you see yourself writing a historical gay romance? Could a gay romance “work” in a historical setting?

Midsummer coverCertainly! A gay romance could work in almost any historical setting. Granted, depending on where and when the story is set, the male characters might have to keep their relationship a secret, or at least be surrounded by other characters who are open minded about a same-sex romance.

Several of my straight historical romances have included gay or bisexual characters, or the characters have explored same-sex fantasies. For example, when I wrote Midsummer Night’s Delights, I didn’t know that Julian or his wife had same-sex fantasies until I started writing. (Characters sometimes like to surprise us writers!) I trusted my instincts and wrote the story that was in my head. (That book has plenty of m/m and ménage scenes, and I wrote two sequels that are even hotter, Midwinter Night’s Delights and Ultimate Night’s Delights.)

Two of my other historical romances, A Most Unfortunate Prince and AMUP LrgRedemption from a Dark Past also feature very important gay characters. So, as you can see, I’ve already incorporated m/m romance into historical settings. As of right now, I don’t have plans to write a full-length gay historical romance, but you never know when inspiration will strike!

 

#3: What are some basic elements that go into writing a good gay romance? Are they harder to write than a straight romance?

Let’s go back to English class for a minute. All good books (regardless of genre) need to have the same basic elements: a believable plot, interesting fleshed-out characters the readers can root for (with histories and backstories), sensory details that pull the reader into the story, and good dialogue. These elements go into every romance (and horror story) I write, whether it’s an erotic historical/fantasy, straight paranormal, or gay contemporary. Once you get the basics down, you can write just about anything; mysteries, suspense, spy novels, and even children’s books.

Writing a gay romance is really no different than writing a romance in any other genre, but some people get hung up on the idea of writing intimate love scenes, not understanding how the characters should act, or getting the story right—but that could happen when you’re writing any book, in any genre. My advice is: Just write the story. Let the characters tell you what happens and start typing.

 

#4: Are you going to write more gay romances? What’s in the works for you?
Yes, I’m currently working on the outline for a new contemporary gay romance. The story will take place over a summer holiday weekend and deal with issues of self-acceptance, recovery, and coming to terms with your past. As of now, I think it’ll be a mild, heat level 1 story. But I never know how things will turn out until I start writing! The book will probably come out in early 2021. Of course, if I get great ideas for other gay romances (historical or contemporary), I’ll write those too!

I hope you enjoyed this FAQ blog. If you missed Part 1, you can catch up on the blog section of my site: https://www.kelliwilkins.com/blog

Here’s the book summary for A Secret Match. I bet you’ll fall in love with the characters as much as I have. And if you want more of Ev, check out his character interview on my blog: https://www.kelliwilkins.com/post/celebrate-pride-month-with-a-chat-with-everett-from-a-secret-match

Enjoy & Happy Reading!

Kelli A. Wilkins

 ~~~

ASM

A SECRET MATCH

Everett Kinkade is a world-famous professional wrestler and the sexy heartthrob of millions of adoring female fans. But Ev has a secret he doesn’t dare share with anyone. He’s gay.

After years of being Ev’s secret lover, Josh is tired of hiding in the shadows and wants Ev to openly acknowledge their relationship. Coming out is the last thing Ev wants and fears it will ruin his career.

One night in a moment of truth, Everett outs himself on live TV. There’s no going back, and his announcement sparks a firestorm of problems—both personally and professionally. He’s forced to come to grips with who he really is while facing down a manipulative boss and a tag-team out to destroy him.

Torn between living a lie and losing the man he loves, Ev has risked everything… can he find a balance between his career and his heart?

 

Order A Secret Match here:

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01FERW65A

All other platforms: https://books2read.com/u/md6rZb

Read reviews here: https://www.kelliwilkins.com/a-secret-match

 

 ~~~

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kelli A. Wilkins is an award-winning author who has published more than Kelli A Wilkins100 short stories, 20 romance novels, 6 non-fiction books, and 2 online writing courses. Her romances span many genres and heat levels, and she’s also been known to scare readers with her horror stories.

In January 2020, Kelli published Love, Lies & Redemption, a western romance set in 1877 Nebraska. This novel blends a sensual love story with mystery and danger.

She released Romance Every Weekend: 104 Fun Ways to Express Your Love, a non-fiction guide to romance in 2019. The book features 104 fun and easy ways you can express your love to that special someone in your life. Perfect for men or women, it focuses on tender, everyday gestures that let your partner know how much you love him or her.

Kelli published Extraterrestrial Encounters, a collection of 18 sci-fi stories, in 2019. If you like horror fiction, don’t miss her disturbing novella, Nightmare in the North.

Kelli has authored two online writing courses: Fiction Basics: Finding Ideas and Fiction Writing for Beginners. These courses are perfect for anyone who wants to learn how to write. Visit: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/ for more details.

Not just an author, Kelli is also an amateur photographer. Visit her pages on Shutterstock https://www.shutterstock.com/g/kelli+wilkins and iStock https://www.istockphoto.com/portfolio/kelliwilkins to view her photos.

Kelli posts on her main Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins and she created a Facebook page for her Gay Romances: https://www.facebook.com/GayRomancesbyKelliAWilkins/

Follow her on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor and visit her website/blog www.KelliWilkins.com to learn more about all of her writings.

Writing Gay Romances: 4 FAQ (Part 1) by Kelli A Wilkins

Hi everyone,

My name is Kelli A. Wilkins and I write romances in every genre and heat level from mild to super-spicy. When people learn that I write gay romances they usually ask “Why would you write one of those? You’re not a man or gay.”

I generally respond with “Why shouldn’t I write gay romances? I wrote a vampire romance, and I’ve never been a vampire.” (That quiets them down for a while.)

I get a lot of questions about “why” or “how” I write gay romances. To celebrate Pride month, I’m sharing four FAQ about writing m/m romances. In the second part of this blog, I’ll share four more questions from readers and authors.

~~~

#1: You’ve written lots of straight romances. Why write gay romances?

Why not? I’m a writer. And as a writer, I write whatever romance book comes to me, whether it’s a contemporary, historical, paranormal, or gay romance. My stories are about people who meet, fall in love, and overcome obstacles to be with one another.

This basic philosophy applies whether the characters are same-sex, different sex, or space alien and earth girl. Love is love and romance is romance. I’m not married to one specific genre or heat level. I go where the story and the characters take me.

When I wrote Four Days with Jack, A Secret Match, and Killer in Wolf’s ASMClothing I trusted my instincts and wrote the story that was in my head. Although all three books are contemporary gay romances, they’re very different.

In A Secret Match, a big part of the storyline centers around Everett dealing (or rather, not dealing) with his sexuality, and his (un)willingness to be open about who he really is. Ev has been in a committed relationship for years and is afraid that if he doesn’t come out, he’ll lose the love of his life. He’s also worried about his career. How will the world view a gay wrestler? Will there be backlash if he comes out?

David from Four Days with Jack has never come to terms with his sexuality. He’s been lying to himself for years about his orientation and hiding his true desires. David has always loved his gay best friend (Jack) and has fantasized about being his lover, but he lacked the courage to admit his feelings—until now.

KIWCThe main characters in Killer in Wolf’s Clothing are comfortable with their sexuality, but have other issues to deal with (like shapeshifting and a serial killer). This erotic paranormal is a fun look at the werewolf legend and blends romance, mystery, danger, humor, and sizzling love scenes.

 

#2: How do you write the gay love scenes in your books?

I approach a same-sex love scene the same way I would if I was writing about a hetero couple. When I write a straight romance, about half of the scenes are written from a male point of view, so I’m used to writing in (and thinking in) a male “voice” anyway.

There’s not much difference in writing a story from two male points of view. Writing a love scene isn’t only about the gender or the anatomy of the characters—it’s about creating a believable, intimate scene where two people express their love for each other.

Each character in each book is unique, so the love scenes are always approached from different directions. In Four Days with Jack, David is introduced to a world of new experiences. Everett and Josh’s first kiss in A Secret Match is a tender and sweet moment; and the first time readers meet Deke from Killer in Wolf’s Clothing they realize he’s anything but shy.

 

#3: What’s the hardest part about writing a gay romance?

The answer to this might be surprising, and no, it has nothing to do with bedroom activities. The hardest part about writing a same-sex romance or m/m love scene is pronouns.

As I’m writing, I’ll dash off something like: “He ran his hand down his chest and…” Wait, what? He ran his own hand down his own chest? No… I have to pay extra close attention when revising or editing a same-sex scene. Too many “his” references and the reader doesn’t know who is doing what. Better to say: “He ran his hand down Kevin’s chest and…”

 

#4: Are you concerned about what people will think about you writing gay romances?

Not in the least. People will think whatever they want. I realize that not everyone wants to read the same type of romance. Some readers love historicals, others only read contemporaries or paranormals, and that’s fine. But if readers are turned off to me as an author just because I write gay romances… well, that’s too bad, see ya.

When I wrote my first gay romance, I considered “what people would think” about the book and me writing it—for about three seconds. Then I reminded myself that I’m a writer, and I create the characters and scenes that make up the book.

I don’t worry about what people might think of me writing about two male characters kissing, going to bed, or making dinner. Basically, the story needs to be told, and I’m the one telling it. As a writer, I’ve made up all sorts of things: an erotic Bigfoot story, a historical Viking tale, detailed ménage scenes (in all combinations), and a first-person vampire love story.

Writers need to turn off their internal editors and forge ahead with the story as it should be (and needs to be) told. If we constantly worried about what grandma would think about our writing, or if we were afraid to open up and let the characters (and the story) take us into the bedroom, we’d never write anything except G-rated fables.

Now more than ever, I’m just as proud/PRIDEful of my gay romances as I am of my straight romances. Why? Because I’m a romance writer—and in my books, everyone deserves to be in love and live happily-ever-after with whatever partner they choose.

And that’s the way it should be… in fiction and in real life. Here’s the book summary to my first gay romance, Four Days with Jack. I hope you’ll check it out. I fell in love with the characters, and I hope readers will too. It’s got a good blend of humor, drama, and plenty of hot love scenes!

I hope you enjoyed this FAQ blog. Stay tuned for Part 2, and don’t forget, you can catch up on all of my blogs on the blog section of my site: https://www.kelliwilkins.com/blog

Enjoy & Happy Reading!

Kelli A. Wilkins

~~~

FDWJ

FOUR DAYS WITH JACK

When David invited his best friend on vacation, he never expected them to fall in love…

Spending four days in a tropical paradise with Jack is a dream come true. For years, David has lived a lie and denied his romantic feelings for Jack. Now that they’re together in an isolated Caribbean resort, he finally admits what he really wants—to be Jack’s lover.

Jack has been in love with David for years and is encouraged by his desire to explore a sexual relationship. He’s more than willing to introduce David to the life he has always fantasized about. Their sizzling nighttime encounters confirm David’s long-hidden cravings, but what will happen when they leave the resort?

Will David come out and start a new life with Jack? Or will he go back to his old ways and risk losing the best friend he ever had?

Order Four Days with Jack here:

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071FTMWHL        

All other platforms: https://books2read.com/u/bo6Rap

Read reviews here: https://www.kelliwilkins.com/four-days-with-jack

 ~~~

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kelli A. Wilkins is an award-winning author who has published more than Kelli A Wilkins100 short stories, 20 romance novels, 6 non-fiction books, and 2 online writing courses. Her romances span many genres and heat levels, and she’s also been known to scare readers with her horror stories.

In January 2020, Kelli published Love, Lies & Redemption, a western romance set in 1877 Nebraska. This novel blends a sensual love story with mystery and danger.

She released Romance Every Weekend: 104 Fun Ways to Express Your Love, a non-fiction guide to romance in 2019. The book features 104 fun and easy ways you can express your love to that special someone in your life. Perfect for men or women, it focuses on tender, everyday gestures that let your partner know how much you love him or her.

Kelli published Extraterrestrial Encounters, a collection of 18 sci-fi stories, in 2019. If you like horror fiction, don’t miss her disturbing novella, Nightmare in the North.

Kelli has authored two online writing courses: Fiction Basics: Finding Ideas and Fiction Writing for Beginners. These courses are perfect for anyone who wants to learn how to write. Visit: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/ for more details.

Not just an author, Kelli is also an amateur photographer. Visit her pages on Shutterstock https://www.shutterstock.com/g/kelli+wilkins and iStock https://www.istockphoto.com/portfolio/kelliwilkins to view her photos.

Kelli posts on her main Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins and she created a Facebook page for her Gay Romances: https://www.facebook.com/GayRomancesbyKelliAWilkins/

Follow her on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor and visit her website/blog www.KelliWilkins.com to learn more about all of her writings.

Things You Notice When You Print Out Your Novel

Excellent writing/editing advice! 👍

things-you-notice-when-you-print-out-your-novel

This week I printed out ‘Novel 2’ for the first time. It took me right back to early last year, when I printed out ‘Novel 1’ for the first time. I posted a blog back then sharing reasons to print your work in progress. This time I’d like to focus not so much on the reasons why you should print your work, but the things you’ll notice when you do.

via Things You Notice When You Print Out Your Novel

#Review “How Not to Write Female Characters” by Lucy V Hay

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5/5 Stars!

I’ve read dozens of resources on writing over the last few years and How to Not Write Female Characters zooms straight to the top of the list.

The author’s light but focused approach sheds the industry double-speak and gets right to the heart of the matter—the way females are depicted in literature and subsequently, television and movies.

Using current popular works from a variety of mediums as examples, author Lucy V Hay explains the type of characters that pull readers in and holds their attention by detailing what types of characters should not be written, without being arrogant or preachy.

This read was also thought-provoking as it made me look back on my favorite female characters and found they were not tropey, cookie cutter types playing one of the roles from Hay’s NOT lists. Instead, the characters were well fleshed out with attributes and deeper personalities that went beyond being beautiful and desired.

How Not to Write Female Characters isn’t just good writing advice, it’s a valuable tool any author should own because this short read isn’t just about the kick-ass hottie or lead love interest, but all female characters.

Enjoy!

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Female characters. When fifty per cent of your potential target audience is female, if you’re not writing them in your screenplay or novel? You’re making a BIG mistake!

But how should you approach your female characters? That’s the million-dollar question … After all, women in real life are complex, varied and flawed. Knowing where to start in creating three dimensional female characters for your story is extremely difficult.

So … perhaps it’s easier to figure out how NOT to write female characters?

Script editor, novelist and owner of the UK’s top screenwriting blog http://www.bang2write.com, Lucy V Hay has spent the last fifteen years reading the slush pile. She has learned to spot the patterns, pitfalls and general mistakes writers make when writing female characters – and why.

In How Not To Write Female Characters, Lucy outlines:

•WHO your character is & how to avoid “classic” traps and pitfalls
•WHAT mistakes writers typically make with female characters
•WHERE you can find great female characters in produced and published content
•WHEN to let go of gender politics and agendas
•WHY female characters are more important than ever

Lucy is on a mission to improve your writing, as well as enable diverse voices and characters to rise to the top of the spec pile.

Currently FREE on all retailers!

Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Kobo

~~~

#1DayBlogBlitz “How Not to Write Female Characters” by Lucy V Hay

tour banner

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cover

Female characters. When fifty per cent of your potential target audience is female, if you’re not writing them in your screenplay or novel? You’re making a BIG mistake!

But how should you approach your female characters? That’s the million-dollar question … After all, women in real life are complex, varied and flawed. Knowing where to start in creating three dimensional female characters for your story is extremely difficult.

So … perhaps it’s easier to figure out how NOT to write female characters?

Script editor, novelist and owner of the UK’s top screenwriting blog http://www.bang2write.com, Lucy V Hay has spent the last fifteen years reading the slush pile. She has learned to spot the patterns, pitfalls and general mistakes writers make when writing female characters – and why.

In How Not To Write Female Characters, Lucy outlines:

•WHO your character is & how to avoid “classic” traps and pitfalls
•WHAT mistakes writers typically make with female characters
•WHERE you can find great female characters in produced and published content
•WHEN to let go of gender politics and agendas
•WHY female characters are more important than ever

Lucy is on a mission to improve your writing, as well as enable diverse voices and characters to rise to the top of the spec pile.

Currently FREE on all retailers!

Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Kobo

~~~

REVIEWS FOR LUCY V’S WRITING ADVICE:

‘A timely guide to creating original characters and reinvigorating tired storylines. ‘
– Debbie Moon, creator and showrunner, Wolfblood (BBC)

‘Lucy V. Hay nails it’
– Stephen Volk, BAFTA-winning screenwriter: Ghostwatch, Afterlife, The Awakening

‘Packed with practical and inspirational insights’
– Karol Griffiths, development consultant and script editor, clients include ITV, BBC, Warner Brothers

‘A top-notch, cutting-edge guide to writing and selling, not just practical but inspirational. Lucy’s distinctive voice infuses the entire journey. Quite brilliant. Here’s the woman who’ll help you make things happen.’
– Barbara Machin, award-winning writer & creator of Waking the Dead

‘Delivers the stirring call to arms that writers must not only write, but take their work to the next level themselves, making sacrifices and taking risks if they want to see their stories on screen.’
– Chris Jones, Filmmaker, Screenwriter & Creative Director at the London Screenwriters Festival

‘Writing and Selling Thriller Screenplays is a must-read for any writer, producer or director looking to create (or in the process of creating) a thriller production. It could also be immensely useful for those generally curious about the genre or looking to learn more.’ – Film Doctor

‘Lucy V Hay explains what a script reader and editor’s role in film-making, tells you to work on your concepts and that dialogue is the last thing to work on in her new book.’ – Brit Flicks

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Lucy V HayAuthor Bio

Lucy V. Hay is an author, script editor and blogger who helps writers via her Bang2write consultancy. Lucy is the producer of two Brit Thrillers, DEVIATION (2012) and ASSASSIN (2015), as well as the script editor and advisor on numerous other features and shorts.  Lucy’s also the author of  WRITING AND SELLING THRILLER SCREENPLAYS for Kamera Books’ “Creative Essentials” range, as well as its follow ups on DRAMA SCREENPLAYS and DIVERSE CHARACTERS.

Social Media Links

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#GuestBlog “Six Simple Writing Tips” by Kelli A. Wilkins

fiction writing screenshot

By Author Kelli A. Wilkins

 Hi everyone!

One of the most common questions I’m asked when I do an interview is, “Do you have any writing tips or advice for beginning writers?” Well, I sure do! These six practical tips are based on advice I received in my writing classes when I was just starting out and discoveries I made as I wrote. Enjoy!

Take Writing Classes: I took my first writing class at a local community college “for something to do” and was hooked. Writing classes are an excellent way to learn the basic mechanics of writing, to understand storytelling techniques, and to explore different genres. However, they’re not for people who “think about wanting to write” but never do. Homework and class participation are required.

In most cases, the instructor gives you an assignment (to write a short story or an opening chapter of a novel) and has you share it with the class. This may sound easy, but over the years I saw dozens of people drop out of writing classes because they actually had to write!

Writing classes help you overcome a fear or shyness about sharing your work with others and different readers give you feedback (and critiques) on what you’ve written. Before I took a writing class I never shared my work with anyone, but I quickly learned to move past a personal attachment to the work and be open-minded when it came to suggestions and comments.

Connections you make with other writers can also continue once class has ended—you may form your own writing group or get together to critique each other’s stories. If there are no “in person” writing classes available in your area, consider taking online classes or attending workshops at writing conferences.

Avoid “Bad” Words: Make a list of words you find yourself repeating (or over-using) in your writing. If you belong to a writing group or have a critique partner, ask them to identify words you use too often. (They may be more obvious to an outside reader.) After you’ve finished a story, do a search for each word and either delete it (if it’s not needed) or change it to a different word.

Some of my “bad” words are: glanced, looked, laughed, that, even, just, once, would, could, felt, shook his head, somehow, started to, although, even though, suddenly, a minute later, a few minutes later, after a few minutes…

It’s also a good idea to search for similarly-spelled words and make sure you’re not accidentally using the wrong word. Spellcheck won’t know you meant to say “tried” instead of “tired.” Some to look out for include: gaps/gasp, gong/going, from/form, though/thought/through.

Rejection Really is Subjective: Got rejected? Join the club. Everyone (and I mean everyone) gets rejected. Rejection is probably the only 100% guarantee in writing. If you send your story (or query) out to five people, you’ll get five different responses. Rejection is hard to deal with, but as a writer you have to understand that the editor is rejecting the story, not you.

All editors are not created the same, and sometimes you’ll never know why your story didn’t make the cut. You might get a form letter that tells you nothing, or get no response at all. Other times you might get a cryptic line about “not what we’re looking for” and sometimes you’ll get a paragraph with some explanation (weak plot, characters are not interesting, etc.).

Several years ago I received two rejections in the same day for the same book. Editor A said she loved the story and the characters were fantastic but didn’t see a market for “that type” of romance. Editor B said she despised the characters and hated the clothes the heroine wore, but would consider re-reading it if I changed the entire plot and made the heroine into a perky sexpot.

Who was “right?” Neither of them. I considered their rejections a perfect example of “everyone has his/her own opinion” and moved on. The important thing to remember after you’ve been rejected is to keep going. If the editor made suggestions (change the ending, add more dialogue, make the heroine a blonde with four kids) consider the comments and either make the changes or don’t. No matter what, it’s your story. But keep writing and submitting, because you never know when you’ll get an acceptance.

What’s Where?: Keep a list of when and where you submit your writing. Note the title of the piece (or query subject), date, and publication. This way, you’ll know what’s where and how long ago you sent it. This is handy in case you need to follow up on a wayward query or submission. I also make a list of places to submit to next, (just in case of rejection!) so I’ll know where the story is headed.

Reading Everything is Fundamental!: Writers are usually doing one of two things: reading or writing. Read anything and everything—in your genre and out of your genre—to expand your horizons. The more you read, the more you’re exposed to different styles of writing, tone, voice, and characterization. Read fiction, non-fiction, magazine articles, writing magazines, and the back of cereal boxes. You’ll see how other writers (even famous authors) create setting, mood, and how they tell a great story. (And why not learn from the best?)

Give Yourself Time to Rest: No, this doesn’t mean get lazy and slack off when you don’t feel like writing. A day (or a few hours) off can be a reward for finishing a long project, for completing all the work on your writing “to do” list for the week, or for celebrating a sale. Go for a walk and stretch after sitting in front of the computer and let your mind recharge. Give yourself some freedom and “play” time—you’ve earned it! Taking a mini-break from writing is also helpful if you need to break out of writer’s block. Think about something else besides your story, and in most cases, an idea or a great plot twist will pop into your head when you least expect it.

If you want even more writing advice, why not check out my online writing course, Fiction Writing for Beginners?

 Fiction Writing for Beginners is designed for anyone who is interested in writing and needs practical advice on how to get started, plus motivation and encouragement to keep writing.

Thirteen easy-to-follow classes cover the writing process from start to finish. You’ll learn where writers get ideas, how to create characters, get expert tips on writing your story, and find out how to submit it for publication. Everything you need to know to start writing is wrapped up in this comprehensive and fun course.

Each class is self-contained and self-directed. This way, you can learn about a specific topic at your own pace, and not worry about completing the class by a certain deadline. Short writing exercises at the end of each class highlight the subject matter and get you writing.

If you’ve always wanted to write, Fiction Writing for Beginners will get you started. Visit the course page to learn more and enroll: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/

 I hope you enjoyed these tips. I welcome comments and questions from readers. You can contact me via the address on the News page of my site, or on social media.

Happy Writing,

Kelli A. Wilkins

 ~~~

Kelli Wilkins ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kelli A. Wilkins is an award-winning author who has published more than 100 short stories, 19 romance novels, 5 non-fiction books, and 2 online writing courses. Her romances span many genres and heat levels, and she’s also been known to scare readers with her horror stories.

She published the second half of her flash fiction series, Cupid’s Schemes, in early 2019. These two volumes of lighthearted mini-romances are perfect reads for a quick lunchtime escape or an after-work indulgence.

Kelli released her latest Teachable mini-course, Fiction Basics: Finding Ideas in February 2019. She authored Fiction Writing for Beginners through Teachable in 2018. These courses are perfect for anyone who wants to learn how to write. Visit: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/ for more details.

If you like horror fiction, don’t miss her latest novella, Nightmare in the North.

Kelli posts on her Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins and Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor.

Visit her website www.KelliWilkins.com and blog http://kelliwilkinsauthor.blogspot.com/ to learn more about all of her writings.

~~~

CATCH UP WITH KELLI

 Here’s a full list of where you can find Kelli on the web.

Website: http://www.KelliWilkins.com

Blog: http://kelliwilkinsauthor.blogspot.com/

Amazon Author Page: www.amazon.com/author/kelliwilkins

Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor

Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins

Facebook Historical Romances: https://www.facebook.com/Historical-Romances-by-Kelli-A-Wilkins-1703805359922371/

Facebook Contemporary Romances: https://www.facebook.com/Contemporary-Romances-by-Kelli-A-Wilkins-1965702023664339/

Facebook Gay Romances: https://www.facebook.com/GayRomancesbyKelliAWilkins/

FREE READS: http://www.manicreaders.com/KelliAWilkins/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kelliwilkins2/

Bookbub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/kelli-a-wilkins

Books2Read: https://www.books2read.com/ap/nkvddR/Kelli-A-Wilkins

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/KWilkinsAuthor/

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Camp NaNo Update Day #10

Camp NaNo – a third of the way through the journey! 😊👍

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I come across a good post about writing schedules almost daily. Many authors and bloggers have unique and precise methods of ensuring time is allotted daily for writing.

My writing schedule looks like a casual suggestion.

Don’t get me wrong, I write somethingevery day… at some point. The schedule part? That’s tricky.

via Camp NaNo Update Day #10

How to Write an Effective Chase Scene

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by Doug Lewars

Either a villain is fleeing from the forces of law-and-order or your hero is fleeing from overwhelming danger, but in either case you need a chase scene. Any form of transportation can be used and the overall structure of the narrative will be reasonably uniform although the specifics will change in each case.

Basically the scene starts with one individual threatening another. The individual so threatened departs in haste while the first person pursues. Both need to avoid obstacles and eventually either the pursued will escape or be captured. The trick, then, is to make the scene exciting.

via How to Write an Effective Chase Scene

Scrivener: 10 pros and cons of everyone’s favorite writing software

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If you’re a writer and haven’t heard of Scrivener, you’ve most likely been living under a rock. Don’t worry, I was once the same. But the more involved I became in the community, the rumblings got louder and the arguments became more insistent.

Why aren’t you using Scrivener to write your novels?! It’s the best thing EVER.

I can’t tell you how many times I heard it.

First let me explain the gist.

via Scrivener: 10 pros and cons of everyone’s favorite writing software

On Writing Multiple POVs

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by Lizard is Writing

 

Anonymous asked: “Hi Lizard! I have an idea for a writing piece I want to do. I have characters, a majority of the plot, and a brief outline of the ending. The only thing is, I don’t know how to begin in a way that isn’t overwhelming to the reader. I have a bunch of different characters who all need to be in the same place at the same time. I don’t know how to write in multiple perspectives in a way that doesn’t drag on or go too quickly. Any advice?”

via On Writing Multiple POVs