#GuestPost “Set New Writing Goals for 2020” by Kelli A. Wilkins

Set New Writing Goals for the New Year

By Author Kelli A. Wilkins

www.KelliWilkins.com

Happy New Year!

It’s January and everyone is talking about making changes and setting goals Kelli Wilkinsfor themselves. And why not? We have brand-new calendars hanging on our walls that are filled with unexplored days yet to come.

But do you find yourself gazing at your new calendar and wondering, “How is it 2020? Where did last year – or decade – go? I had all those plans…”

If so, don’t stress out. Not everyone accomplishes every goal they set for themselves. Take some time to look back at what you achieved last year and start thinking about this year. Evaluating your writing goals and setting reasonable action steps now will help you get on target for 2020.

Keep in mind that everyone’s writing career and writing goals are different. Think about what you want for you. Do you want to finish the novel you started last year (or haven’t started yet)? Send out a dozen short stories? Enter a contest?

If you write magazine articles, are there any major publications you’re targeting? Start brainstorming ideas now, make a list of places to send queries, and check out potential markets for their latest submission guidelines. (It’s also time to be thinking 3 to 6 months ahead and plan those spring and summer articles.)

Is the writing part going fine, but you need to develop (or enhance) your online profile and/or marketing? Are your blog, website, and author page(s) up-to-date? Should they get a refresh (or a major overhaul) for the new year?

Make a list of all you want to accomplish in the next few weeks and months. Having a list of projects and priorities will help keep your writing objectives on track.

If you’re determined to write a new book, make a timeline for research, character development, plotting, etc. Give yourself a deadline for when you want to start writing and stick to it. Decide how many pages or chapters you want to finish each day/week/month. Little by little, your book will take shape, and you’ll be amazed at your progress.

No matter what your writing goals are, a little pre-planning will help you focus and allow you to flow from one writing project to another. Preparation also keeps you motivated and fends off writer’s block, because you always have “the next thing” to work on.

If you want to learn more about the writing process, why not check out my online writing class?fiction writing banner Fiction Writing for Beginners is designed for anyone who is interested in writing and needs practical advice on how to get started, PLUS motivation and encouragement to keep writing.

Thirteen easy-to-follow classes cover the writing process from start to finish. You’ll learn where writers get ideas, how to create characters, get expert tips on writing your story, and find out how to submit it for publication. Everything you need to know to start writing is wrapped up in this comprehensive and fun course.

If you’ve always wanted to write, Fiction Writing for Beginners gives you all the tools you need. Visit the course page and enroll here: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/

Not interested in an online course? On a budget? How about an ebook? Check out my non-fiction writing guide, You Can Write—Really! A Beginner’s Guide to Writing Fiction. It’s only $2.99.

you can write cover

The book is designed for writers who need a boost of motivation and simple instructions on how to get started. Each chapter targets a specific aspect of writing and includes tips and fun exercises.

If you’re ready to write, order your copy here:

Amazon

All other platforms: https://books2read.com/u/4AqYN4

 

Enjoy the New Year!

Kelli A. Wilkins

~~~

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kelli A WilkinsKelli A. Wilkins is an award-winning author who has published more than 100 short stories, 19 romance novels, 6 non-fiction books, and 2 online writing courses. Her romances span many genres and heat levels, and she’s also been known to scare readers with her horror stories.

In November 2019, she released Romance Every Weekend: 104 Fun Ways to Express Your Love, a non-fiction guide to romance. The book features 104 fun and easy ways you can express your love to that special someone in your life. Perfect for men or women, it focuses on tender, everyday gestures that let your partner know how much you love him or her.

Kelli published Extraterrestrial Encounters, a collection of 18 sci-fi stories, in August 2019. If you like horror fiction, don’t miss her disturbing novella, Nightmare in the North.

Her historical romance, The Viking’s Witch, was released in June 2019. This full-length novel takes place in Celtic Scotland and blends a sensual romance with paranormal elements.

 In March 2019, Kelli published Dangerous Indenture, a historical mystery romance set in Colonial Pennsylvania. She released the second half of her flash fiction series, Cupid’s Schemes, in early 2019. These two volumes of lighthearted mini-romances are perfect reads for a quick lunchtime escape or an after-work indulgence.

 Kelli released a Teachable mini-course, Fiction Basics: Finding Ideas in February 2019. She also authored Fiction Writing for Beginners through Teachable. These courses are perfect for anyone who wants to learn how to write. Visit: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/ for more details.

Not just an author, Kelli is also an amateur photographer. Visit her pages on Shutterstock https://www.shutterstock.com/g/kelli+wilkins and iStock https://www.istockphoto.com/portfolio/kelliwilkins to view her photos.

Kelli posts on her Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins and Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor.

Visit her website/blog www.KelliWilkins.com to learn more about all of her writings.

~~~

#GuestBlog “Six Simple Writing Tips” by Kelli A. Wilkins

fiction writing screenshot

By Author Kelli A. Wilkins

 Hi everyone!

One of the most common questions I’m asked when I do an interview is, “Do you have any writing tips or advice for beginning writers?” Well, I sure do! These six practical tips are based on advice I received in my writing classes when I was just starting out and discoveries I made as I wrote. Enjoy!

Take Writing Classes: I took my first writing class at a local community college “for something to do” and was hooked. Writing classes are an excellent way to learn the basic mechanics of writing, to understand storytelling techniques, and to explore different genres. However, they’re not for people who “think about wanting to write” but never do. Homework and class participation are required.

In most cases, the instructor gives you an assignment (to write a short story or an opening chapter of a novel) and has you share it with the class. This may sound easy, but over the years I saw dozens of people drop out of writing classes because they actually had to write!

Writing classes help you overcome a fear or shyness about sharing your work with others and different readers give you feedback (and critiques) on what you’ve written. Before I took a writing class I never shared my work with anyone, but I quickly learned to move past a personal attachment to the work and be open-minded when it came to suggestions and comments.

Connections you make with other writers can also continue once class has ended—you may form your own writing group or get together to critique each other’s stories. If there are no “in person” writing classes available in your area, consider taking online classes or attending workshops at writing conferences.

Avoid “Bad” Words: Make a list of words you find yourself repeating (or over-using) in your writing. If you belong to a writing group or have a critique partner, ask them to identify words you use too often. (They may be more obvious to an outside reader.) After you’ve finished a story, do a search for each word and either delete it (if it’s not needed) or change it to a different word.

Some of my “bad” words are: glanced, looked, laughed, that, even, just, once, would, could, felt, shook his head, somehow, started to, although, even though, suddenly, a minute later, a few minutes later, after a few minutes…

It’s also a good idea to search for similarly-spelled words and make sure you’re not accidentally using the wrong word. Spellcheck won’t know you meant to say “tried” instead of “tired.” Some to look out for include: gaps/gasp, gong/going, from/form, though/thought/through.

Rejection Really is Subjective: Got rejected? Join the club. Everyone (and I mean everyone) gets rejected. Rejection is probably the only 100% guarantee in writing. If you send your story (or query) out to five people, you’ll get five different responses. Rejection is hard to deal with, but as a writer you have to understand that the editor is rejecting the story, not you.

All editors are not created the same, and sometimes you’ll never know why your story didn’t make the cut. You might get a form letter that tells you nothing, or get no response at all. Other times you might get a cryptic line about “not what we’re looking for” and sometimes you’ll get a paragraph with some explanation (weak plot, characters are not interesting, etc.).

Several years ago I received two rejections in the same day for the same book. Editor A said she loved the story and the characters were fantastic but didn’t see a market for “that type” of romance. Editor B said she despised the characters and hated the clothes the heroine wore, but would consider re-reading it if I changed the entire plot and made the heroine into a perky sexpot.

Who was “right?” Neither of them. I considered their rejections a perfect example of “everyone has his/her own opinion” and moved on. The important thing to remember after you’ve been rejected is to keep going. If the editor made suggestions (change the ending, add more dialogue, make the heroine a blonde with four kids) consider the comments and either make the changes or don’t. No matter what, it’s your story. But keep writing and submitting, because you never know when you’ll get an acceptance.

What’s Where?: Keep a list of when and where you submit your writing. Note the title of the piece (or query subject), date, and publication. This way, you’ll know what’s where and how long ago you sent it. This is handy in case you need to follow up on a wayward query or submission. I also make a list of places to submit to next, (just in case of rejection!) so I’ll know where the story is headed.

Reading Everything is Fundamental!: Writers are usually doing one of two things: reading or writing. Read anything and everything—in your genre and out of your genre—to expand your horizons. The more you read, the more you’re exposed to different styles of writing, tone, voice, and characterization. Read fiction, non-fiction, magazine articles, writing magazines, and the back of cereal boxes. You’ll see how other writers (even famous authors) create setting, mood, and how they tell a great story. (And why not learn from the best?)

Give Yourself Time to Rest: No, this doesn’t mean get lazy and slack off when you don’t feel like writing. A day (or a few hours) off can be a reward for finishing a long project, for completing all the work on your writing “to do” list for the week, or for celebrating a sale. Go for a walk and stretch after sitting in front of the computer and let your mind recharge. Give yourself some freedom and “play” time—you’ve earned it! Taking a mini-break from writing is also helpful if you need to break out of writer’s block. Think about something else besides your story, and in most cases, an idea or a great plot twist will pop into your head when you least expect it.

If you want even more writing advice, why not check out my online writing course, Fiction Writing for Beginners?

 Fiction Writing for Beginners is designed for anyone who is interested in writing and needs practical advice on how to get started, plus motivation and encouragement to keep writing.

Thirteen easy-to-follow classes cover the writing process from start to finish. You’ll learn where writers get ideas, how to create characters, get expert tips on writing your story, and find out how to submit it for publication. Everything you need to know to start writing is wrapped up in this comprehensive and fun course.

Each class is self-contained and self-directed. This way, you can learn about a specific topic at your own pace, and not worry about completing the class by a certain deadline. Short writing exercises at the end of each class highlight the subject matter and get you writing.

If you’ve always wanted to write, Fiction Writing for Beginners will get you started. Visit the course page to learn more and enroll: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/

 I hope you enjoyed these tips. I welcome comments and questions from readers. You can contact me via the address on the News page of my site, or on social media.

Happy Writing,

Kelli A. Wilkins

 ~~~

Kelli Wilkins ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kelli A. Wilkins is an award-winning author who has published more than 100 short stories, 19 romance novels, 5 non-fiction books, and 2 online writing courses. Her romances span many genres and heat levels, and she’s also been known to scare readers with her horror stories.

She published the second half of her flash fiction series, Cupid’s Schemes, in early 2019. These two volumes of lighthearted mini-romances are perfect reads for a quick lunchtime escape or an after-work indulgence.

Kelli released her latest Teachable mini-course, Fiction Basics: Finding Ideas in February 2019. She authored Fiction Writing for Beginners through Teachable in 2018. These courses are perfect for anyone who wants to learn how to write. Visit: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/ for more details.

If you like horror fiction, don’t miss her latest novella, Nightmare in the North.

Kelli posts on her Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins and Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor.

Visit her website www.KelliWilkins.com and blog http://kelliwilkinsauthor.blogspot.com/ to learn more about all of her writings.

~~~

CATCH UP WITH KELLI

 Here’s a full list of where you can find Kelli on the web.

Website: http://www.KelliWilkins.com

Blog: http://kelliwilkinsauthor.blogspot.com/

Amazon Author Page: www.amazon.com/author/kelliwilkins

Twitter: www.Twitter.com/KWilkinsauthor

Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorKelliWilkins

Facebook Historical Romances: https://www.facebook.com/Historical-Romances-by-Kelli-A-Wilkins-1703805359922371/

Facebook Contemporary Romances: https://www.facebook.com/Contemporary-Romances-by-Kelli-A-Wilkins-1965702023664339/

Facebook Gay Romances: https://www.facebook.com/GayRomancesbyKelliAWilkins/

FREE READS: http://www.manicreaders.com/KelliAWilkins/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kelliwilkins2/

Bookbub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/kelli-a-wilkins

Books2Read: https://www.books2read.com/ap/nkvddR/Kelli-A-Wilkins

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/KWilkinsAuthor/

Shutterstock: https://www.shutterstock.com/g/kelli+wilkins

iStock: https://www.istockphoto.com/portfolio/kelliwilkins

Newsletter sign-up: http://eepurl.com/HVQqb

Teachable Online Writing Courses: https://kelliwilkins.teachable.com/

~~~

Scrivener: 10 pros and cons of everyone’s favorite writing software

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If you’re a writer and haven’t heard of Scrivener, you’ve most likely been living under a rock. Don’t worry, I was once the same. But the more involved I became in the community, the rumblings got louder and the arguments became more insistent.

Why aren’t you using Scrivener to write your novels?! It’s the best thing EVER.

I can’t tell you how many times I heard it.

First let me explain the gist.

via Scrivener: 10 pros and cons of everyone’s favorite writing software

Curated Content For Writers August 18

It’s not Friday without Curated Content! Enjoy! ☺

Story Empire

Content Curation worldHappy Friday, SE Readers. It’s time for another round of writing tips we’ve found around the web. If you haven’t read Harmony’s post, Lost in Translation, be sure to check it out. Also, my post this week is about Writing and Music.

And now, for this week’s curated content.


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Curated Content for Writers—August 4

OMG! How could I forget the Curated Content? Good stuff here, WordPressers! 👍👍

Story Empire

old fashioned manual typewriterHappy Friday, wonderful SEers! The end of the week is always a reason for celebration. I hope your first days venturing into a new month have been filled with fun, good books,  and prolific writing.

Speaking of writing, the SE authors have cobbled together a new collection of writing links. Before sampling the latest, take a moment to check out this week’s featured posts—Drip Campaigns by Staci Troilo and my own “It’s in the Stars . . . or Not” 

Then enjoy a Friday Fix with . . .


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My HOW TO 101: Has been Updated and Upgraded for easier referencing…

Resource of the week! You must see it to believe it! There’s a ‘How-to’ here for you! 😉👍

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

INDEX

To make it a little easier to find the HOW TO you need, I’ve split them up into the following topic headings, just click on a heading to go to the topic listed links, then click on the post you want to read.

Click on INDEX at the bottom of each list to return here.

If you’d like to bookmark my HOW TO 101: PAGE,click HERE for the link

PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF ANY LINKS OR TOPICS ARE NO LONGER WORKING OR VALID.

Copyright & Infringement

Editors and Editing

Facebook

Marketing & Publicity

Miscellanea

MS Word

Publishing / Formatting Ebooks & KDP

Social Media

WordPress & Blogging

Writing Tips

Copyright Infringement

Copyright Your Book

Deal with Book Piracy

Establish a Copyright

Protect Yourself from Copyright Violation

INDEX

Editors & Editing

Become an Editor

Edit Your Editors Edit

Help Your Editor and Save Money

Contact an Editor

Find Your…

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Curated Content for Writers

It’s like the Story Empire team are mind readers – such a great group of links – and I made the list! WOOT! 😉 😉

Story Empire

Content Curation worldCiao, SEers. Another week has flown by, and we’ve got another list of links from around the writers’ web for you.

Before we get to that, though, if you missed our earlier posts this week, you might want to check them out.

And now, this week’s curated content:


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Read Your Way to Better Writing

What are your favorite writing resources?

Story Empire

Hello, Story Empire Readers. Joan here today. For those who live in the United States, I hope you had a fun-filled July 4th celebration.

Today, I’m going to talk about continuing education. Doesn’t exactly sound like fun, but bear with me. My daytime job is in the field of healthcare. Nurses, physicians, lab techs, even coders must have a certain number of continuing education units in order to renew their licenses each year.

As writers, continuing education isn’t required, but I believe we should strive to become better with each article, short-story, or novel we pen. There are a number of ways we can do this, the first of which is “just write.” The more we write, the more the edit, the more we refine, the better our writing will become.

Another way is to read and follow blogs such as Story Empire (Wink, wink.) There are a number of…

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Curated Content, June 30, 2017

Don’t miss this week’s Curated Content from Story Empire! 😉

Story Empire

Welcome to another Friday, Story Empire fans. Craig here, and it’s been a busy week for me. I’m taking some vacation time at work to focus on some writing related projects.

One of my projects is to get your weekly selection of content links put together. I snapped this photo at the Warhawk Air Museum last winter. Museums have curated content too, and it makes for a great place to visit.

I posted about things you can do with your author blog to increase your footprint on Monday. You can check it out here, if you missed it.

Then P. H. Solomon had the Wednesday post about Scrivener backups which you can read here if you also missed it.

These are a collection of helpful posts we put together every Friday, and we might as well get to them.

***

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Curated Writing Content June 23

Friday means the end of the week – and more Curated Writing Content! 😉👍

Story Empire

old fashioned fountain pen with blank writing paper, feather and ink quiillHappy Friday, SEers! In honor of the bestest day of the week (well, except for Saturday), the SE authors have rounded up another collection of useful posts to stash in your writing cache.

First, if you haven’t already eyed them up, may I humbly suggest you check out Staci Troilo’s post about fictional fathers here and my post about a particular pesky word here. Then it’s time to meander through these goodies:


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