Things You Notice When You Print Out Your Novel

Excellent writing/editing advice! 👍

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This week I printed out ‘Novel 2’ for the first time. It took me right back to early last year, when I printed out ‘Novel 1’ for the first time. I posted a blog back then sharing reasons to print your work in progress. This time I’d like to focus not so much on the reasons why you should print your work, but the things you’ll notice when you do.

via Things You Notice When You Print Out Your Novel

What to Do After the First Draft

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by Katie McCoach

Your fingers hurt. Your eyes burn. You haven’t had anything to drink except coffee for the past few days, weeks, year. You are pretty sure you haven’t slept a full night without dreaming about characters and plot lines.

You are certain you will never type again. Because you finally finished writing the first draft of your novel. Phew!

No matter how many times an author finishes the first draft of a novel, they know this is only the beginning of the writing process. So what do you even do after you write that first draft? What comes next? Where do you even begin the process of revising, rewriting, sharing, and more?

via What to Do After the First Draft

How To Become a Professional Author

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by Laura Peters

Becoming an established author is easier today than it has ever been in the past. That is thanks to services like Createspace and Lightning Source that enable anyone with the skills to self-publish their work in a print-on-demand format.

However, getting your books onto Amazon doesn’t guarantee anyone will buy or read your stories. With that in mind, this article will provide you with a short step-by-step guide you can use to ensure you get the best results from your efforts.

 

Step 1: Decide if self-publishing is right for you

So, there are two options on the table for people in your position. You could try to find a traditional publisher like Stephen King, Daniel Handler, and other established authors, or you could self-publish.

via How To Become a Professional Author

15 Thoughts Every Writer Has When They Aren’t Writing

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by Michael Cristiano

Not being able to write is a sad fact of life for a writer. There’s laundry to do, there’s food to cook, there’s sleep to be had. Worse, I have this pesky illness that eats up a lot of my time. I toil day in and day out to keep it at bay and under control. Sometimes, it creeps into my evenings, just when I think I’ve escaped. Worse, the horror of it all often keeps me awake at night and the dread fills my dreams with terror and sadness.

Oh, I’m not sick… I have a 9-to-5 job.

In any case, the truth is that my job isn’t that bad. I love the people I work with and to be honest, the job in and of itself is mostly an enjoyable and painless experience. But what I’m getting at is that I often feel like I don’t have a lot of time or energy at the end of the day to do what I really love: writing! Instead, I’m left repeating the same thoughts over and over again in my head as I toil through things that I would rather not do if it meant I had more time to write.

Here are a few of those thoughts:

via 15 Thoughts Every Writer Has When They Aren’t Writing

How to Write an Effective Chase Scene

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by Doug Lewars

Either a villain is fleeing from the forces of law-and-order or your hero is fleeing from overwhelming danger, but in either case you need a chase scene. Any form of transportation can be used and the overall structure of the narrative will be reasonably uniform although the specifics will change in each case.

Basically the scene starts with one individual threatening another. The individual so threatened departs in haste while the first person pursues. Both need to avoid obstacles and eventually either the pursued will escape or be captured. The trick, then, is to make the scene exciting.

via How to Write an Effective Chase Scene

Are You an Insecure Writer? Or Just in Denial?

Great insight! 👍

Andrea Lundgren

Many of my blogging friends have belonged to a group called the Insecure Writer’s Support Group, a blog-hop hosted by Alex Cavanaugh that gives writers a chance to interact with each other, encourage each other, and discuss a question related to writing once a month. I’ve enjoyed their posts over the years, though I’ve never commented or joined the list, until now…because of the name.

I know, a terribly petty reason, but I guess I was trying so hard over the past years to not be insecure about my writing that joining a group that said “I’m insecure” was too difficult. I believe in positive thinking and not mentally “owning” things you want to get rid of, and I was choosing to not be insecure. I was sharing my writing online. I was letting friends and family read it. The group could be helpful, pleasant, and nice, but it…

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8 Essential Elements for Writer Websites


When it comes to finding success as a writer, there are few elements (outside the actual writing, of course) more important than a website. This post shares eight essential elements for writer websites to find more success.

#1: About Page

Believe it or not, the “about me” page is commonly the page with the second most traffic on author websites (after the home page). And it shouldn’t be a surprise because people who search you out or who end up on your website will naturally want to know more about you.

So be sure to give the “about me” page the love and attention it deserves. Many successful writer websites use this page as a way to tell their story while also pointing folks to relevant parts of the site.

Follow link to continue

Source: 8 Essential Elements for Writer Websites

Using the Five Senses in Fiction, Part Two: Smell, Touch, & Taste

Part II – Yes! 😉

Writers After Dark

Five senses Part Two

“I was afraid that by observing objects with my eyes and trying to comprehend them with each of my senses I might blind my soul altogether.” —Socrates

I say let’s blind our readers’ souls with our stories! What? Seems legit to me. *shrugs*

As an author, your job is to transport your reader into the story and have them go through the full journey. And the use of the five senses is the simplest way to do so. They help with taking in information from the world around us, and help convey a message to the readers by providing a strong image in their souls . . . err, heads.

If you missed last week’s post on Using the Five Senses in Fiction, Part One: Sight and Sound, what are you waiting for? Go check it out!!! 😀

Now let’s get to the last three senses: smell, touch…

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Personality Types and Writers

You HAVE to take this quiz! Very interesting and surprisingly accurate! Please share your results! Now I have to go find my new BFF – Colin Powell! 😄

Story Empire

Are writers introverts? So many of us say we are, but personality tests show that how we view ourselves is not always how others view us. I’ve been subjected to a number of personality and team-building profiles in the business world and I always find them interesting.

Many years ago I took a detailed Myers-Brigg test conducted by my local college. If you’re unfamiliar with Myers-Brigg, it’s based on the foundation that there are sixteen personality types which are factored from four key elements:

Favorite World
Do you focus on the outer world (Extraversion • E) or the inner world (Introversion • I)

Information
Do you focus on the basic information you take in (Sensing • S) or do you interpret and add meaning (Intuition • N)

Decisions
Do you look at logic and consistency first (Thinking • T) or people and special circumstances (Feeling • F)

Structure
When…

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Curated Content for Writers April 21

Story Empire has served up another round of must-have resources and writing aids! 😉

Story Empire

Happy Friday, SE readers. Joan here. Once again it’s time for the six of us at Story Empire to share helpful links to articles we’ve found useful.

And in case you missed them, don’t forget Mae’s post about tips for a successful book signing and Staci’s post on media kits and news releases.

And now, we give you the best of what we’ve found around the web this week.


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