#Featured “Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography” by Zora Neale Hurston

Zora NH

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Introduction by

Maya Angelou

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From Zora Neale Hurston, the author of Their Eyes Were Watching God and one of the most important African American writers of the twentieth century, comes her riveting autobiography—now available in a limited Olive Edition.

First published in 1942 at the height of her popularity, Dust Tracks on a Road is Zora Neale Hurston’s candid, funny, bold, and poignant autobiography—an imaginative and exuberant account of her childhood in the rural South and her rise to a prominent place among the leading artists and intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance.

As compelling as her acclaimed fiction, Hurston’s very personal literary self-portrait offers a revealing, often audacious glimpse into the life—public and private—of an extraordinary artist, anthropologist, chronicler, and champion of the Black experience in America. Full of the wit and wisdom of a proud, spirited woman who started off low and climbed high, Dust Tracks on a Road is a rare treasure from one of literature’s most cherished voices.

“Warm, witty, imaginative. . . . This is a rich and winning book.”—The New Yorker

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AMAZON

#BookBlitz “Cubbyhole Kid” by C.E. Joseph

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coverTeen / YA Biography, Memoirs
Date Published: November 2019
Publisher: Page Publishing
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Cubbyhole Kid is a heartrending true story of dysfunction and abuse in a California family in mid-1960s.
It tells the harrowing survival story of a young four-year-old boy as he recounts his days being raised in a strict Irish Catholic family while expressing his gratitude and love for two incredible women that saved his life—his protective fourteen-year-old sister, his godmother, and his beautiful, religious mother. Together, along with his other siblings, his brothers, they painfully navigated their abusive, alcoholic, ex-military father through the mid-1960s, Los Angeles. While dealing with a severe childhood anxiety, suicidal depression, physical and learning disabilities at such a young age, the boy traveled inside the cubbyhole, a small, two-by-four middle section of the family station wagon, unexpectedly experiencing his World War II veteran father’s life-threatening road rage.
With the fear of death always looming, the boy witnessed his father’s all too familiar, unpredictable violence, explosive temperament, and heavy drinking during our country’s escalating involvement in the Vietnam War, the hippie cultural movement, riots in the streets, and arguably the heyday of rock-and-roll music.
The story describes the boy’s fond memories and relationship with his older sister, who bravely kept him shielded from their father’s harsh punishments and became like a second mother to him. While he experienced the beauty of life outside the home during his sister’s “coming-of-age” teenage years, along with her friends who were part of the youth cultural shift that seemingly took place overnight. The nightly demonstration of violence and abuse, coupled with his father’s unwillingness to accept the generational changes taking place with society’s youth, and his mother’s unexpected illness, would seem too much and test the young boy’s faith.

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About the Author

C.E. Joseph

 

C. E. Joseph is a first-time author who grew up in Los Angeles and is currently married and resides in Louisiana.

 

 

 

Contact Links

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#GuestPost Giuseppe Cafiero, author of “Vincent Van Gogh: The Ambiguity of Insanity”

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 Five Things I’d Ask Vincent van Gogh if he Were Alive Today

By Giuseppe Cafiero

Van GoghVincent van Gogh died on 29 July 1890, but his enduring legacy will long continue. The historian, academic and acclaimed author Giuseppe Cafiero has studied the painter’s life and times for more than a decade. Here, Cafiero reveals the questions he’d ask van Gogh if he was around today.

In the Hollywood movie, Night at the Museum, the resident docent Rebecca Hutman (played by Carla Gugino) is writing a thesis about Lemhi Shoshone guide, Sacajawea. Hutman’s research is exhaustive but some questions will always remain unanswered unless she had the opportunity of questioning her heroine face-to-face.

In that movie, Hutman’s dream comes true when Sacajawea comes to life. Sadly for me, my own dream of meeting Vincent van Gogh will remain just that – a dream. But should the impossible happen and I had the opportunity of questioning my hero, here’s what I’d ask:

  1. How did you value the light in your paintings and what does light mean to you, if anything?
  2. How did you manage to create that wonderful yellow that appears in the Sunflowers series and in so many more of your paintings?
  3. What emotions did you feel before commencing a new portrait?
  4. How did you feel when you were in the sun of the Midi?
  5. How did you play with the prospects?

And yes, before you ask, I’d also ask him about his ear.

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Title: Vincent Van Gogh: The Ambiguity of Insanitycover

Author: Giuseppe Cafiero

An abrasive itinerary of the presence of women, the landscape and obsession. Such are the internal paradigms that went through the compelling life of the Post-Impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh.

Not flesh and blood women, but the woman as a guide: Mrs. Jones, the woman as a mother; Kee Vos; Christine Hoornik of Siena; Margot Begemann. The Portrait-women such as Augustine Roulin and Madame Ginoux. And then the backgrounds, endless, unforgettable in this genius’s works: Isleworth, Amsterdam, le Borinage, Arles, St. Remy, Auvers-sur-Oise, where Vincent van Gogh spent his life trying to capture the colors, the atmosphere, the light.

The pain of finitude and his obsession with achieving redemption through art, with intimate and stormy religiosity, with brotherly love, with the French noon sun and, in short, with death. A hard-working and unwavering life where art interacted, in a painful gesture, with the iron will of a hand that never lost its way.

The life of a beloved and devoted man, silenced by the anguish and despair of creation, who could only find peacefulness when he found his own death.

Vincent Van Gogh: the Ambiguity of Insanity is a fictionalized biography and gripping novel of the life of the Nineteenth-Century Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh. The author, Giuseppe Cafiero, draws a psychological portrait of the Post-Impressionist painter through the women that marked his life and the cities in which he lived.

Links

USA

Amazon.com

Audible.com

iTunes

Canada

Amazon.ca

Audible.ca

iTunes

Australia

Amazon.com.au

Audible.com.au

iTunes

UK

Amazon UK

Audible

iTunes

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Giuseppe CafieroAbout Giuseppe Cafiero

Giuseppe Cafiero lives in the Tuscan countryside, in Lucignano, in the province of Arezzo, Italy.
Born in Naples, he spent his childhood in several Italian cities. In Bologna he began to attend intellectual circles at Roberto Roversi ‘s renowned bookstore, “Palma Verde”. It was in one of the magazines published by this cultural center, that the first part of “James Joyce – Rome and other stories” was first published.

He later worked for various radio producers, especially Radio Capodistria and the Italian Swiss Radio so he moved to Tuscany. Finally he was able to devote himself to reading and to pursue his literary work.

His main literary influence is Calvin, author of extraordinary literary intellectual subtlety and intelligence. Giuseppe Cafiero continuously reads Borges, another great sublime, inimitable author who also worshiped Joyce.

Giuseppe Cafiero has written renditions, free adaptations, productions for radio and translations from French to Italian. The spectrum of names is extensive, from Shakespeare to O’Neill, from Raspe to Daudet, from Toller to Brecht. He has written for theatre and radio, collaborating also with the RAI, Radio Sveringes and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Cafiero favours the writing style “bio-fiction” and has completed three books in this literary style; James Joyce, Rome and other stories, Vincent van Gogh and The Unwary Shops on the Life and Work of Monsieur Gustave Flaubert, Writer.

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“Confessions of a Call Centre Worker” by Izabelle Winter

Confessions of a Call Centre Worker cover

Confessions of a Call Centre Worker

by Izabelle Winter

Genre: Memoirs/Entertainment & Humor

99¢ at time of posting! Kindle Countdown!

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to work in a call centre?

Imagine speaking to members of the public fifty or more times every day, always having to be courteous and professional no matter what they say to you.

Could you keep your cool while talking to all levels of stupid?

Would you be able to wear a headset all day without wanting to throw it out of the window?

All calls are recorded, analysed and timed to the second. Average handling time (AHT) is discussed as if it’s the very meaning of life and managers are always coming up with new ways to shave milliseconds from each call.

Is it acceptable to only have a total eight minutes a day for visits to the toilet or coffee machine?

Imagine not being allowed to hang up on someone who is screaming abuse down the line at you.

Welcome to the Call Centre!

Izabelle worked in call centres for many years; from insurance to home shopping, from selling advertising to discussing loans. Finally in the early hours one morning, she decided enough was in fact far too much and left her final call centre job the same day, never to return.

On her way out of the door for the final time she vowed she would write a book about life in a call centre.

Here is that book. Read about call centres in general, memorable customers and staff. How do staff stay sane? What is Big Red? Are cranberries the true meaning of Christmas?

Why would you have leather trousers round your ankles in a lift? How not to impress your boss. Izabelle shares these and many other true tales from her years of incarceration in UK call centres.

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“Rabbit: A Memoir” by Patricia Williams

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Rabbit: A Memoir

by Patricia Williams

Genre: Biographies/Humor

9.99 at time of posting!

Nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work

“An absolute must-read” – Shondaland

“[Rabbit] tells how it went down with brutal honesty and outrageous humor” – New York Times

They called her Rabbit.

Patricia Williams (aka Ms. Pat) was born and raised in Atlanta at the height of the crack epidemic. One of five children, Pat watched as her mother struggled to get by on charity, cons, and petty crimes. At age seven, Pat was taught to roll drunks for money. At twelve, she was targeted for sex by a man eight years her senior. By thirteen, she was pregnant. By fifteen, Pat was a mother of two.

Alone at sixteen, Pat was determined to make a better life for her children. But with no job skills and an eighth-grade education, her options were limited. She learned quickly that hustling and humor were the only tools she had to survive. Rabbit is an unflinching memoir of cinematic scope and unexpected humor. With wisdom and humor, Pat gives us a rare glimpse of what it’s really like to be a black mom in America.

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“My Mother, A Serial Killer” by Hazel Baron

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My Mother, A Serial Killer

by Hazel Baron, Jennifer Fife-Yeomans (Contributor)

Genre: Memoirs/True Crime/Serial Killers

1.99 at time of posting!

A gripping and shocking story of a serial killer mother, and the brave daughter who brought her to justice. Dulcie Bodsworth was the unlikeliest serial killer. She was loved everywhere she went, and the townsfolk of Wilcannia, which she called home in the late 1950s, thought of her as kind

and caring. The officers at the local police station found Dulcie witty and charming, and looked forward to the scones and cakes she generously baked and delivered for their morning tea.

That was one side of her. Only her daughter Hazel saw the real Dulcie. And what she saw terrified her.

Dulcie was in fact a cold, calculating killer who, by 1958, had put three men in their graves – one of them the father of her four children, Ted Baron – in one of the most infamous periods of the state’s history. She would have got away with it all had it not been for Hazel.

Written by award-winning journalist Janet Fife-Yeomans together with Hazel Baron, My Mother, A Serial Killer is both an evocative insight into the harshness of life on the fringes of Australian society in the 1950s, and a chilling story of a murderous mother and the courageous daughter who testified against her and put her in jail.

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“In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox” by Carol Burnett

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In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox

by Carol Burnett

Genre: Biographies/Memoirs/Comedians/Television

1.99 at time of posting!

In this New York Times bestseller, comedy legend Carol Burnett tells the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of her iconic weekly variety series, The Carol Burnett Show.

In In Such Good Company, Carol Burnett pulls back the curtain on the twenty-five-time Emmy-Award winning show that made television history, and she reminisces about the outrageously funny and tender moments that made working on the series as much fun as watching it.

Carol delves into little-known stories of the guests, sketches and improvisations that made The Carol Burnett Show legendary, as well as some favorite tales too good not to relive again. While writing this book, Carol rewatched all 276 episodes and screen-grabbed her favorite video stills from the archives to illustrate the chemistry of the actors and the improvisational magic that made the show so successful.

Putting the spotlight on everyone from her costars to the impressive list of guest stars, Carol crafts a lively portrait of the talent and creativity that went into every episode. With characteristic wit and incomparable comic timing, she details hiring Harvey Korman, Vicki Lawrence, Lyle Waggoner, and Tim Conway; shares anecdotes about guest stars and close friends, including Lucille Ball, Roddy Mcdowell, Jim Nabors, Bernadette Peters, Betty Grable, Steve Lawrence, Eydie Gorme, Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth, and Betty White; and gives her take on her favorite sketches and the unpredictable moments that took both the cast and viewers by surprise.

This book is Carol’s love letter to a golden era in television history through the lens of her brilliant show. Get the best seat in the house for “eleven years of laughter, mayhem, and fun in the sandbox.”

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“When I was Puerto Rican: A Memoir (A Merloyd Lawrence Book)” by Esmeralda Santiago

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When I was Puerto Rican: A Memoir (A Merloyd Lawrence Book)

by Esmeralda Santiago

Genre: Biographies & Memoirs/Hispanic & Latino

9.99 at time of posting!

One of “The Best Memoirs of a Generation” (Oprah’s Book Club): a young woman’s journey from the mango groves and barrios of Puerto Rico to Brooklyn, and eventually on to Harvard

In a childhood full of tropical beauty and domestic strife, poverty and tenderness, Esmeralda Santiago learned the proper way to eat a guava, the sound of tree frogs, the taste of morcilla, and the formula for ushering a dead baby’s soul to heaven. But when her mother, Mami, a force of nature, takes off to New York with her seven, soon to be eleven children, Esmeralda, the oldest, must learn new rules, a new language, and eventually a new identity. In the first of her three acclaimed memoirs, Esmeralda brilliantly recreates her tremendous journey from the idyllic landscape and tumultuous family life of her earliest years, to translating for her mother at the welfare office, and to high honors at Harvard.

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“Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution” by Ji-Ji Jiang

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Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution

by Ji-Ji Jiang

Genre: Memoirs/Middle Grades/Geography & Culture/History/Asia

1.99 at time of posting!

Publishers Weekly Best Book * ALA Best Book for Young Adults * ALA Notable Children’s Book * ALA Booklist Editors’ Choice

Moving, honest, and deeply personal, Red Scarf Girl is the incredible true story of one girl’s courage and determination during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century.

It’s 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, popularity, and a bright future in Communist China. But it’s also the year that China’s leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution—and Ji-li’s world begins to fall apart. Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. And when Ji-li’s father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life.

Written in an accessible and engaging style, this page-turning autobiography will appeal to readers of all ages, and it includes a detailed glossary and a pronunciation guide.

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