#AudioTour “The House Called Hadlows (Sebastian and Melissa Book 2)” by Victoria Walker

Author: Victoria Walker

Narrator: Kim Bretton

Length: 5 hours and 34 minutes

Publisher: Victoria Clayton Limited

Series: Sebastian and Melissa, Book 2

Released: Jul. 22, 2020

Genre: Fantasy; Children’s

The sequel to The Winter of Enchantment and the return of Mantari the magic cat.Sebastian and Melissa would never forget their arrival at the house called Hadlows. The long drive through the neglected park and woodland, the lake glimpsed through trees, the house, with its “thousand windows” looking down on them and the great hall, empty but for the portraits covering the walls. Hadlows held a secret, of that they were sure.

Victoria Walker was twenty-one when she wrote The Winter of Enchantment in 1968. A second story about Sebastian and Melissa, The House Called Hadlows, was published in 1972. In 1973 she went to Cambridge University to read English and married immediately after finishing her degree. Two children followed and two decades passed before she began to write under her married name of Victoria Clayton. She lives with her husband in Northamptonshire.

Narrator Bio

Kim is an accomplished and award winning actress and director with West End/Broadway theatre credits. Kim has narrated over 35 audiobooks and counting. She is also an in demand voice over talent in the commercial and corporate arena and owns her own class A recording studio in Nashville. Kim is from the UK but has lived in NYC, L.A. and now Nashville TN. She continues to work in Theatre, Film and TV as an actress and a director alongside narrating audiobooks and commercial voice overs.

Guest Post
By Victoria Clayton, March 2007

Those readers who were patient enough to persevere to the end of the introduction to The Winter of Enchantment may recall that The House Called Hadlows was written at the kitchen table of a tumble-down farmhouse in a valley in wildest Wales in the company of a Polish Count and an involuntary assassin. I thought rather more about the plot of this second book before I wrote it and it is a little more polished in consequence. As the rain poured and the fields became liquid mud and only the bracken flourished I pursued Sebastian, Melissa and Mantari through another set of adventures and derived much comfort from them to set against the insuperable difficulties of looking after forty cows and two hundred sheep with the help of two incompetents. I was of course hopelessly inexperienced myself. Before I moved to Wales I spent a short time living in a water mill just outside Hadlow Down in Sussex. It was a very pretty place, four storeys of a room apiece with an overhanging jetty at the top, painted clapboard inside and out. It was surrounded by tall trees and might have been a painting by Constable or a setting for a novel by George Eliot. The only drawback was the noise. Night and day the water from the mill race that debouched into the pond with a drop of ten feet or so roared in one’s ears like the torture of tinnitus until one became distracted to the point of madness. The iimillers of the past had gone home at the end of the day, of course, and so saved their sanity. Anyway, the experience provided part of the title of The House Called Hadlows.It was after the collapse of the Welsh enterprise and a lonely sojourn on Skye that I decided to read English at Cambridge University. This was in the days when Oxbridge didn’t care much about your A levels but much more about what assessment they made of you. I wrote an essay entitled The Wise Man Learns from the Experience of Others. I wrote reams but I got into rather a muddle and came to no conclusion. The interview that followed was nerve-wracking. I was given a Shakespearean sonnet to talk about but such was my state of anxiety that I could make nothing of it. The words trickled through my brain without making any sense. I asked if I could have a cigarette to help me to concentrate. Lifted eyebrows; sighs, frowns, all the windows were opened; I lit up. Silence while we all waited for Gauloise-fuelled brilliance from me. Nothing. I still couldn’t understand a word. It was terribly humiliating. One of the dons took pity and asked me about my life and achievements so far. I gave a Bowdlerized version, making as much as I could of the publication of The Winter of Enchantment and The House Called Hadlows, skating over the rest with proper reticence. I was astonished to be offered a place a few weeks later.Cambridge changed my life, undoubtedly for the better. As far as learning anything went, I was not a particularly diligent student. I still don’t know how to structure an essay and almost every one was written hastily in the six hours before it was due to be handed in. But the ethos was tolerant and inclusive and having been persona nongrataat my hidebound, class-bound, anti-intellectual school it was refreshing to find oneself accepted by authority. What difficulties there were during those three years were the result of a characteristic bit of woolly thinking on my part. Before moving to Cambridge I spent a few months in a rented house in Shropshire; a romantic black and white fifteenth century building on the slopes of a wooded valley. At its head were the Stiperstones, a windy ridge home to curlews and skylarks. At its summit is the Devil’s Chair. Legend says that whenever it is hidden by mist the devil sits there. I used to walk up there on my own quite a bit. It is a place of sinister beauty and I was not altogether surprised when I met one day a dark-visaged man to whom I was immediately attracted. Certainly he was not the devil. He was, more prosaically, a Kurd.At first his being of a different nationality, race and culture was a definite plus. In those days I wanted to believe that good communication was all that was required to banish strife and brutality and racism from the world. I was after all a flower child, albeit by this time rather an old one at twenty-five. The dark visaged one was a Cambridge graduate. He was handsome, clever and charming — a divine combination, you might think. Everything he told me about Mesopotamia sounded extravagantly exotic —love in a glamorous, kilim-decorated tent; eating pomegranates beneath a sinking desert sun. I thought our differences were fascinating but essentially superficial. In all important ways we shared interests that transcended cultural divergences.In fact it was quite the other way round. What I discovered when I embarked on what turned out to be a slalom (interesting, instructive but downhill) of a love affair was that the things we had in common — shared tastes in books, art, music, jokes, architecture — were relatively unimportant. Our differences were ethical and therefore fundamental. For one thing we had opposing views about the relative importance of men versus women. Being of the generation that had embraced Women’s Lib with fervour I was not pleased to find myself rated just above beasts of burden but lower than an opium-stewed wife-beating pavement barber in a back-street bazaar.But it certainly wasn’t all bad. We liked each other at intervals and we taught each other much that was useful. I bought a dilapidated cottage in the country, ten miles from Cambridge. It was thatched and white-washed with gables that leaned so far from the vertical that special insurance was needed before builders would agree to work on it. I enjoyed unbricking fireplaces and staircases and making my first garden. In spare moments I went to supervisions and read books, took exams. There is an awful lot of English literature. I suppose writing as a career is in some ways a soft option if you don’t care about being rich. It requires nothing more than a pencil and paper and you can do it at home in your dressing gown surrounded by unmade beds and unwashed dishes if that is your preferred domestic style. You require no training and no qualifications. So, it isn’t surprising that the written word abounds and the poor student is obliged to ‘do’ vthe Metaphysical poets in a fortnight and Shakespeare in a term. Of course we just skimmed the surface but what we did learn was roughly how, when and where writers of fiction and history and philosophy fitted in with each other and how to use a library properly. A university course gives you a map and pointers but education is the stuff you put in your own head by reading and thinking all your life long. I made new friends, my life took on a respectability, almost, which I found unexpectedly restful. The dark-visaged one came and went, sometimes delightful, sometimes swinish.It came to a parting of the ways. I barely had time to make a pyre of his collar stiffeners and restaurant receipts before I met the man who has nobly put up with me for thirty years. Nothing is more tedious to read about than a happily married couple so I shall draw a veil over the success or failure of this relationship. Two children, lots of cats and chickens and three moves later we live in a small seventeenth century manor house in Northamptonshire. It has been an amusing exercise to recall the far-off days of my youth as a background to The Winter of Enchantment and The House Called Hadlows, which I hope may have entertained some readers. Now I fill my days writing and gardening, which, ever since I read about Vita Sackville-West doing it, has seemed to me an ideal way to pass the time. For twenty-five years I published nothing. It wasn’t a conscious decision. I found my time fully occupied looking after the children, the livestock: domestic things. But when my son went away to school and my daughter preferred to spend her leisure hours with her pony rather than with me. Suddenly there was hiatus. I started to write for adults and have had six novels published under my married name, Victoria Clayton. A seventh is due in September 2007. A misspent, misguided and wholly idiotic youth have actually proved quite useful in furnishing insights into the vagaries of the human heart.To those who write but haven’t yet found a market, I urge you not to be put off by the stumbling attempts of the industry to identify the Zeitgeist. There is so much luck in it that no one can predict what will happen. My own idea is that one should never write for money, and always write what comes into one’s head first. Keats had a word for it: two, actually — negative capability — which roughly means a deliberate open-mindedness. You make your mind as blank as possible and see what comes into it without trying to be clever or rational. You can tidy it up later. The results are usually surprising. If you have been discouraged by rejections from agents or publishers, gird up your loins and go to: writing is lonely and difficult and discouraging most of the time but the hideous effort is probably worth it. At least you find out a heck of a lot about yourself, which can only be profitable.

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#AudioTour “The Winter of Enchantment (Sebastian and Melissa Book 1)” by Victoria Walker

Author: Victoria Walker

Narrator: Kim Bretton

Length: 4 hours and 13 minutes

Publisher: Victoria Clayton Limited

Series: Sebastian and Melissa, Book 1

Released: Jun. 15, 2020

Genre: Fantasy; Children’s

A magic mirror enables Sebastian to travel from his Victorian world of winter snow and Mrs Parkin to a magic world of Melissa, Mantari, and wicked Enchanter and many other exciting people.This wonderful audiobook follows in the great tradition of the E. Nesbit magic books. Since its first publication in 1969 it has proved its appeal to children of every age.Long out of print until republished by Fidra Books in the UK and Purple House Press in the USA, it received praise from respected children’s authors.The sequel to this book is called The House Called Hadlows.

Victoria Walker was twenty-one when she wrote The Winter of Enchantment in 1968. A second story about Sebastian and Melissa, The House Called Hadlows, was published in 1972. In 1973 she went to Cambridge University to read English and married immediately after finishing her degree. Two children followed and two decades passed before she began to write under her married name of Victoria Clayton. She lives with her husband in Northamptonshire.

Narrator Bio

Kim is an accomplished and award winning actress and director with West End/Broadway theatre credits. Kim has narrated over 35 audiobooks and counting. She is also an in demand voice over talent in the commercial and corporate arena and owns her own class A recording studio in Nashville. Kim is from the UK but has lived in NYC, L.A. and now Nashville TN. She continues to work in Theatre, Film and TV as an actress and a director alongside narrating audiobooks and commercial voice overs.

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#AudioTour “Twelve Mile Bank” by Nicholas Harvey

Author: Nicholas Harvey

Narrator: Kim Bretton

Length: 7 hours and 57 minutes

Publisher: Harvey Books, LLC

Series: AJ Bailey Adventure Series, Book One

Released: Aug. 13, 2020

Genre: Suspense

AJ Bailey was destined to run a dive boat on the beautiful island of Grand Cayman, the Mecca of Caribbean SCUBA diving.As a young girl in England she was captivated by a story her Navy veteran grandfather told. Now, as she’s closer than ever to discovering the long-lost submarine from the story, a wealthy Argentinian arrives; a treasure hunter who’ll stop at nothing to steal the prize.Can AJ find the wreck in time?Or will the Argentinian hunter and his ruthless crew beat her to it?It’s a race against time at treacherous depths to uncover the real secret of the lost submarine.

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Raised in England, working in America and heading for Grand Cayman. That encapsulates Nicholas Harvey’s career that’s been dominated by motorsports from an early age as a driver, then race engineer, to senior manager at the top level of motor racing in the States. Poised in the background has been a second career in writing that flourished into his debut novel, Twelve Mile Bank, the first of the AJ Bailey adventure series which combines a passion for diving, an obsession with military history and a love of the Cayman Islands. Nick and his wife Cheryl can be found touring the world in search of adventure on motorcycles, mountains and dive boats.

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Narrator Bio

Kim is an accomplished and award winning actress and director with West End/Broadway theatre credits. Kim has narrated over 35 audiobooks and counting. She is also an in demand voice over talent in the commercial and corporate arena and owns her own class A recording studio in Nashville. Kim is from the UK but has lived in NYC, L.A. and now Nashville TN. She continues to work in Theatre, Film and TV as an actress and a director alongside narrating audiobooks and commercial voice overs.

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Q&A with Narrator Kim Bretton

When did you know you wanted to be an audiobook narrator?

After a lifetime in the theatre and TV both acting and directing and

also being married to a music producer and songwriter and

having built 4 recording studios it seemed the natural

progression!

How do you manage to avoid burn-out? What do you do to

maintain your enthusiasm for narrating?

I only narrate excellent books! I have really enjoyed every single book

I’ve ever narrated – so that helps. Twelve Mile Bank was easy to

get enthusiastic about. I couldn’t put it down and ended up

finishing the reading ahead of schedule!

Are you an audiobook listener? What about the audiobook

format appeals to you?

I am. So I know how a narrator can make or break a book. I also

understand that different narration styles appeal to different

people and it would never do if we were all the same.

What are your favorite and least favorite parts of narrating an

audiobook?

I love reading and being lost to a whole new world and I love a good

story. So letting the story unfold is always a treat. I love to chat

with authors about characters and find voices for them – that is

hugely creative. The characters become friends. The editing and

mastering process can be rather tedious but I have strategies to

make it a little more interesting.

What would you say are your strongest narration abilities?

Characterization and timing – particularly comedic.

Is there a particular genre you feel unsuited for? Have you ever

declined a project because you didn’t think you were right for it?

I once declined a lovely book about the wines and vineyards of Italy.

Looking up the correct pronunciations of all the Italian words was

hurting my brain and taking the flow out of the reading.

What about this title compelled you to audition as narrator?

Great writing, exciting story – well defined characters and a genre I

hadn’t yet explored. I was completely taken in. I fell in love with

AJ and the gang and Nick’s stunning descriptions of Cayman. I

now want to go diving! Nick has promised he and Cheryl will take

me one day!

How closely do you prefer to work with authors?

I work really closely. I even now consider a few the authors I’ve

worked with friends and we chat outside of work.

The connection between author and narrator is intimate and intense. It

is a privilege to be chosen to read someones work and a task I

don’t take on lightly. An author bares their soul through their

words. I am in awe of that and always do my best to honour and

respect their work. I do my absolute best to exceed their

expectations.

How did you decide how each character should sound in this

title?

Nick and I chatted on the phone extensively before I started. We

discussed character traits, accents, ages and tone. Nick sent me

character descriptions and photographs. They helped

immensely. And we continued to tweak as I progressed with the

work.

What types of things are harmful to your voice?

Not enough sleep and dehydration. And an afternoon doing death

groans and attack yells for a video game…

How does audiobook narration differ from other types of

voiceover work you’ve done?

I spend a lot of my day doing corporate narration and commercials so

my books are the treaty part of my day.

Do you read reviews for your audiobooks?

Yes. And I feel pride when they’re good and a bit sad if I disappointed someone.

If so, which ones stand out to you most, positive or negative?

Picking up a series when another narrator started it can be a

challenge. Listeners expect you to copy the performance of the

previous narrator and that’s not possible.

Who is your “dream author” that you would like to record for?

I’d love to do a Phillip Pullman book.

If you could narrate one book from your youth what would it be

and why?

I always wanted to record The Winter of Enchantment by Victoria

Walker as it was my favourite book as a child. I reached out to

the author and she let me do it! That was a dream come true.

Both Neil Gaiman and Garth Nix had also loved that book as

children and they both gave me lovely shout outs.

What do you say to those who view listening to audiobooks as

“cheating” or as inferior to “real reading”?

I’ve had someone say this to my face when I told them what my job

was. Being read to is a lovely gift. It allows you to rest your eyes

or clean the kitchen or endure a long journey or fall asleep.

Accept the gift….You’re still reading the book! It still counts!! So

much effort, care, creativity and love goes into producing an

audiobook.

What bits of advice would you give to aspiring audiobook

narrators?

Be prepared to kiss your social life goodbye and spend your days in a

cupboard talking to yourself.

What’s next for you?

Right now a Regency Romance, next a Horror and after that book 8 in

a series I love and after that three hilarious Chick Lit rom coms in

a row. I bloody LOVE my job!

Bonus question: Any funny anecdotes from inside the recording

studio?

I keep a file of my favourite outakes. It mainly consists of burps,

hiccups, jump scare screams as someone opens my booth door

while I’m in the middle of reading, trying and failing to say

“grasped” and “clasped” and one of my favourite moments was

failing to say “championing them”. It took me about 30 tries and I

was crying by the end. Ooh and recently I was narrating book 6

in a series and the author killed off one of my favourite

characters. Through tears I cursed him. I sent him the outtake

and he found it so funny it’s now his ringtone!

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#AudioBookBlogTour “Save Her” by Jason Bonet

Audiobook Tour: Save Her by Jason Bonet

Author: Jason Bonet

Narrator: Kim Bretton

Length: 12 hours 15 minutes

Publisher: Jason Bonet

Released: Apr. 30, 2019

Genre: Science Fiction

Natalie wakes bound to a chair. Fear envelopes her. Her captors must know she’s pregnant. Pregnant with Drayden’s baby. Pregnant with offspring that might have some of Drayden’s awesome nanotech powers. She has to escape. Drayden has to find her. They have to save their baby or the enemy will have all that they need to control everything and everyone.

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Jason lives in Kansas City with his daughter and three dogs. He is one of the worst sleepers on the planet, so when he’s awake while others are asleep, he daydreams of really cool stories, some of which make it into his computer and then into Amazon.

Jason is presently writing one series, two stand-alone novels, and two screenplays. Reading Sci-fi is his current interest, but he’ll pick up and devour anything that’s solidly recommended.

Jason checks and replies to his own email, so please shoot him a note after you’ve read one of his books: Author@jasonbonet.com. He’d love to hear from you! If you enjoyed SAVE HER, just wait for the next book in the series titled SAVE THE SEVEN. It absolutely explodes with tension.

Follow Jason’s Amazon Author Page to get notified when SAVE THE SEVEN launches, or, sign up on http://www.jasonbonet.com to get updates on all books in the series.

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Narrator Bio

Kim is an accomplished and award winning actress and director with West End/Broadway theatre credits. Kim has narrated over 35 audiobooks and counting. She is also an in demand voice over talent in the commercial and corporate arena and owns her own class A recording studio in Nashville. Kim is from the UK but has lived in NYC, L.A. and now Nashville TN. She continues to work in Theatre, Film and TV as an actress and a director alongside narrating audiobooks and commercial voice overs.

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Q&A with Author Jason Bonet
  • Tell us about the process of turning your book into an audiobook.
    • This was a brutal process made more difficult because I really didn’t want to read Drayden’s chapters. I have more confidence in narrating than I do acting, and felt it was best left to a trained actor to read the male parts, but alas, I couldn’t because it was costly to hire two different actors for both parts, and the way Audible structures its ‘Producing’ segment makes it challenging to orchestrate the recordings from two separate ‘narrators.’ I listened to a ton of samples on Audible before settling on Kim Bretton to read Natalie’s chapters. As soon as I heard Kim, I knew she would make the book amazing. I just love how she read Natalie and Agent Love. Love it! As soon as I accepted the fact that I would have to read Drayden — despite my internal self-doubt battles — I dove into excruciating internet research to learn the process. I bought one of those Blue Yeti microphones, which came with Studio One 3 audio software, set up a tiny little recording studio in a spare closet, and got to recording. The process was sloooow. I crammed the recording into 3 very long days. Seriously, it was one of the more challenging things I’ve ever done, but I’m so happy I did it. The experience gave me a lot of confidence, and I plan on recording my other two books (which do not have a British female character).
  • Do you believe certain types of writing translate better into audiobook format?
    • No, I think it really comes down to good story matched with a good reader. And when I say story, that also connects to a good non-fiction book well-structured and well-read.
  • Was a possible audiobook recording something you were conscious of while writing?
    • No, not at all for this book. But it is now an absolute part of my plan for previous books and anything I write in the future. I’m really looking forward to my next recording.
  • How did you select your narrator?
    • Kim read a dramatic sequence I sent to her and nailed it. Her voice portrayed softness, elegance, drama, fright and anger, all in a short snippet of time. She’s amazing.
  • How closely did you work with your narrator before and during the recording process? Did you give them any pronunciation tips or special insight into the characters?
    • Very minor instruction because I didn’t want to get in the way of Kim’s acting. She was a pro who demonstrated very obviously that she cared about the project and the characters as much as I did.
  • Were there any real life inspirations behind your writing?
    • No, not this book. I’ve got another that is pulled from a real life event (book is called One Missed Kiss and it’s coming to audiobook before the new year).
  • How do you manage to avoid burn-out? What do you do to maintain your enthusiasm for writing?
    • I just love writing so much. The daily battle for me is not burn-out, it’s that I thin myself out with to many ideas and projects. For instance, I am knee-deep in the sequel but got distracted with a movie idea that I just HAD TO write. Dumb. One project at a time, Jason. Focus, Jason.
  • Are you an audiobook listener? What about the audiobook format appeals to you?
    • I love audiobooks. They transport me just the same way reading does. The first audiobook I ever listened to was like 30 years ago on a trip to college when I listened to the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo on something like 20 different audio tapes. After that, I was hooked. Now it’s all on Audible, which I think is a wonderful app.
  • Is there a particular part of this story that you feel is more resonating in the audiobook performance than in the book format?
    • I think my narrator brought the character of Agent Love to life in a superior way than she is written. She acted her so well, it made me love that character more than I already did.
  • What bits of advice would you give to aspiring authors?
    • Write in bed. Write in your car. Writer everywhere. Write in short stints because those short stints add up more quickly than you think. You don’t have to write every day, but you do have to put effort into your thoughts toward your book every day. Back to the writing in bed thing, do this because your mind will work out the kinks that you can’t solve during the day. Your subconscious mind will fix everything you broke during the day.
  • Do you have any tips for authors going through the process of turning their books into audiobooks?
    • Hire a pro. If you can’t afford to hire a pro and think you can do it yourself, do it yourself.
  • What’s next for you?
    • Save The Seven! No more distractions. No more working on other projects before finishing it. It’s really good so far. Action packed and the characters are doing surprising things. Loving it.

Nov. 28th:

Nesie’s Place

Nov. 29th:

Southern Girl Bookaholic

The Book Junkie Reads . . .

Nov. 30th:

Dab of Darkness Book Reviews

Dec. 1st:

Locks, Hooks and Books

4 the Love of Audiobooks

Dec. 2nd:

Jazzy Book Reviews

Dec. 3rd:

All the Ups and Downs

Eileen Troemel

Dec. 4th:

Teatime and Books

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#AudioBookBlogTour “Realm of Knights” by Jennifer Anne Davis

Author: Jennifer Anne Davis

Narrator: Kim Bretton

Series: Knights of the Realm, Book 1

Length: 7 hours 58 minutes

Publisher: Reign Publishing

Released: Oct. 11, 2019

Genre: Fantasy

Reid has spent her whole life pretending to be a man so she can inherit her father’s estate, but when a chance encounter threatens to expose her lie, she is forced to risk everything.

In the kingdom of Marsden, women are subservient to men, and land can only pass from father to son. So, when Reid Ellington is born, the fifth daughter to one of the wealthiest landholders in the kingdom, it’s announced that Reid is a boy.

Eighteen years later, Reid struggles to conceal the fact she’s actually a young woman. Every day, her secret becomes harder to keep. When one of Marsden’s princes sees her sparring with a sword, she is forced to accept his offer and lead her father’s soldiers to the border. Along the way, she discovers a covert organization within the army known as the Knights of the Realm.

If Reid wants to save her family from being arrested for treason and robbed of their inheritance, she will have to join the knights and become a weapon for the crown.

To protect her family, Reid must fight like a man. To do that, she’ll need the courage of a woman.

This is the first book in a new fantasy series from best-selling author Jennifer Anne Davis

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Jennifer Anne Davis graduated from the University of San Diego with a degree in English and a teaching credential. She is currently a full-time writer and mother of three kids, one weimaraner, and a tortoise. She is happily married to her high school sweetheart and lives in the San Diego area.

Jennifer is the recipient of the San Diego Book Awards Best Published Young Adult Novel (2013), winner of the Kindle Book Awards (2018), a finalist in the USA Best Book Awards (2014), and a finalist in the Next Generation Indie Book Awards (2014).

Publishers Marketplace listed Jennifer as one of the best-selling indie authors in June 2017. She has also been ranked among the top 100 best-selling authors on Amazon.

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Narrator Bio

Kim is an accomplished and award winning actress and director with West End/Broadway theatre credits. Kim has narrated over 35 audiobooks and counting. She is also an in demand voice over talent in the commercial and corporate arena and owns her own class A recording studio in Nashville. Kim is from the UK but has lived in NYC, L.A. and now Nashville TN. She continues to work in Theatre, Film and TV as an actress and a director alongside narrating audiobooks and commercial voice overs.

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Guest Post

What would you say is the heroine’s biggest challenge (beside getting away with pretending to be a man)? By Jennifer Anne Davis

The heroine’s biggest challenge is discovering what it is she wants with her life.

Reid has spent her entire life pretending to be a man, learning to manage her father’s estate, and fitting into society’s expectations of what a person of her position should be. Trough it all, she has never stopped to consider what she wants for herself. Does she want to be a woman and wear dresses like her sisters? Does she want to marry? What about kids?

Reid thought being a man was limiting the things she wanted to do. However, when her life is uprooted and she is forced to be Lady Reid instead of Lord Reid, she discovers that being a woman isn’t as easy as she thought it would be. What she thought would be fun—like wearing a dress—she suddenly realizes isn’t so simple. The fabric and design of a fancy dress is restricting. Yet, women aren’t allowed to wear pants. In addition, she discovers that she can no longer speak her mind in public, walk around town unattended, spar or do sword work, or even ride her horse on her own. The freedoms she took for granted as a man are suddenly stripped from her.

Forced to face the fact that while she is a woman, she prefers the freedoms men have. However, she can’t have both in her society. She knows she can’t live the rest of her life pretending to be a man. However, she isn’t sure she can stand the thought of being a woman every day either.

On top of discovering herself, she also has to navigate the murky waters of love. She has been careful to shield herself from being attracted to men or falling in love. After all, it would have ruined her cover. However, now that she meets a few new people, she doesn’t know what to do when she finds herself attracted to one of them. Reid suddenly feels inadequate, out of her league, and not sure how to behave. She’s never done anything for herself or anything simply because she wants to. But it’s time for all of that to change. It’s time Reid decides who she is, what she wants, and to fight for those things.

 

 

Giveaway

Giveaway: $25 Amazon Gift Card

Realm of Knights Giveaway: $25 Amazon Gift Card

 

Nov. 24th:

AudioSpy

The Writing Train

4 the Love of Audiobooks

Nov. 25th:

History from a Woman’s Perspective

Reading A Page Turner

Nov. 26th:

Books Over Everything

Dab of Darkness Book Reviews

Nov. 27th:

Nesie’s Place

Eileen Troemel

Nov. 28th:

Jorie Loves A Story

Southern Girl Bookaholic

Valerie Ullmer | Romance Author

Nov. 29th:

SERIESous Book Reviews

Sometimes Leelynn Reads

Nov. 30th:

Jazzy Book Reviews

The Book Addict’s Reviews

Teatime and Books

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