#FREE “Murder is a Family Business: A Fun Detective Cozy (The Alvarez Family Murder Mysteries Book 1)” by Heather Haven

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A DETECTIVE AGENCY WITH HEART.
ALSO MOM, KIDS, AND A KITTEN!

It’s a dismal day for the PI firm to the stars of Silicon Valley when their own star is huddled in a phone booth instead of tracking down stolen software. Sadly, ace detective Lee Alvarez is currently taking shelter from a deluge while surveilling some rat of a husband. This is way beneath her dignity!

Worse, she may be trapped with another rat. Something in there just moved.

But Lee’s luck just changed—that’s no drowned rat. It’s her thoroughly drenched, pathetically skinny, and terminally cute new BFF— an orange and white kitten tiny enough to fit in a pocket. Well, forget the surveillance.

When you catch on that this is the kind of mystery that starts with rescuing a kitten, you know you’re in good hands!

But Lee can’t forget the surveillance—she’s been assigned to the case by her formidable boss, the elegant Lila Alvarez (aka her mom), who’s doing a favor for an old friend. When she investigates why the rat hasn’t left his lair, she discovers the worst,— he has a few fresh holes in his chest.

She soon uncovers a criminal web of international proportions amid dark and harrowing dangers she never signed up for. But is she up to a near-death experience? Well! Is a kitten adorable?

Author Haven quickly rolls out all the warm and fuzzy delights a cozy fan could wish for—in the form of a delightfully eccentric, usually squabbling, yet thoroughly loving detective family, each with his or her special talent, beginning with its matriarch. Lila possesses all the WASPy refinement of Princess Grace, in cool contrast to her spirited half-Latina daughter Lee. (Liana to her mom, and that tells you so much!)

Completing the quartet is the adoring uncle you’ve always wanted (he cooks!), and the genius bro’ who made the firm famous with his brilliant cyber-detection. Trust us, this series has everything but tea and cookies.

Fans of PI stories, cozy mysteries, and women sleuths will go bananas,, especially if they love sharp funny female protagonists like Sue Grafton’s witty Kinsey Millhone and Janet Evanovich’s lovable Stephanie Plum. Aficionados of Lisa Lutz’s family series, The Spellman Files, will get a special kick out of the Alvarez clan.

Readers will also enjoy the fact that this series may be a first. Father/son detective teams abound—think The Republic of Doyle and The Good Cop—but mom/daughter sleuths are an idea whose time has come. Step right up and meet Lee and Lila.

FREE for a limited time!

KINDLE UNLIMITED

Amazon


 

#FREE “Life Begins When The Kids Leave Home And The Dog Dies” by Barb Taub

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Chapter 1. A California girl named Barb met her prince of a guy. He was tall, dark, and handsome. (Actually, he was a Republican. But he was definitely tall.) They fell in love, and got married.

Chapter 2. He brought her to his castle in England and they lived happily ever after. THE END**

**Luckily, 35+ years of living happened between Chapters 1 and 2, giving Barb plenty of material for this collection (in no particular chronological order) from her newspaper columns, articles, blog posts, and that time she killed Mom.

And that’s before Chapter 3 even starts.

I have learned to put down the coffee and place breakable objects at a safe distance when a post from Barb Taub comes up. It is very hard to drink coffee and laugh at the same time without redecorating the desk…”—author Sue Vincent

FREE at time of posting!

Kindle Unlimited

Amazon

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#GuestPost “I Love You Always” by LaBena Fleming

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10 Things I Didn’t Know About Becoming a Self-Published Author

By:  LaBena Fleming

When I first made it known I was writing my non-fiction book, I Love You Always, One Family’s Alzheimer’s/Dementia Journey and the Lessons Learned Along the Way, I allowed others to convince me that traditional publishers would have no interest due to my lack of a “substantial” social media following.  Believing what I was told, I decided that I would self-publish.  Knowing little to nothing about the publishing and self-publishing industry, I spent several months conducting research.  I was determined to put out a high-quality book.  Below are some of the things I learned.

  •  If you believe in your book and are not in a hurry to have it published, go through the experience of seeking an agent and pursuing a publisher.  All they can do is tell you no, it’s free, and nothing, other than possibly your pride, will be lost in the process. With traditional publishing, you’ll have the opportunity to earn much more than you spend.
  • Beware of Vanity Presses.  A Vanity Press is a publishing company that you pay to publish your book.  They are not concerned about the quality of your book, or the appeal of your story.  If you are willing to pay, they will publish your book.  Run!
  • Writing your book is the easiest piece of self-publishing.  Once you have written your story, the work of polishing, publishing, and promoting begins and that’s no easy task.
  • Don’t discount the importance of trusted Beta Readers.  My first group of Beta Readers identified a problem with the flow of my story.  Although I hated the feedback, because I liked my story the way it was written, I heeded their advice and rewrote it.  My second group of Beta Readers loved the rewrite, so I’m happy I followed the advice of the first group. 
  • A quality editor is one of your most important investments.  No matter how many times I read through my story, I needed fresh eyes to edit and offer advice.  I believe that one of the quickest ways to end your writing career is to put out a product filled with grammatical and spelling errors.  Your book is a reflection of you.  Invest in yourself.
  • Invest in a high-quality book cover that will look good as a thumbnail.  Your book cover is your first impression.  Is the cover representative of your content?  Many people disregard books solely because they don’t like the cover.  “You only get one chance to make a first impression.”
  • You don’t “need” to purchase your ISBN, but doing so expands the reach of your book.  I published on Amazon’s KDP, which offers free ISBNs.  Accepting their ISBN meant that my book could only be distributed by Amazon or an Amazon distributor.
  • Securing reviews before publishing is very helpful, especially if your goal is to become a best-selling new release author.  Seek social media influencers who are willing to read and promote your book.  Order and send ARC’s (Advance Review Copies). 
  • Understanding book categories is extremely important, especially if your goal is to become a best-selling new release.  Study books that are similar to yours and monitor their rankings over time.  You want to categorize your book where it is appropriate and you have the best chance of becoming a best seller.
  • Marketing is a full-time job and there is life after the launch.  Be ready to put in the work to keep your book visible in the field of millions of other books.  You will need to invest both time and money to do this.

I LOVE YOU ALWAYS

One Family’s Alzheimer’s/Dementia Journey

and the Lessons Learned Along the Way

Nonfiction

Date Published: July 10, 2020

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I Love You Always introduces you to Lottie Mae Polk Berry, a self-proclaimed badass who battles Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia for years, hoping to make it to age 90. Her daughter, LaBena, gives a detailed account of Lottie’s life from her teenage years, through diagnosis and beyond. 

I Love You Always will have you on an emotional roller-coaster as Lottie’s wit and antics send you into hysterical laughter one moment and leave you silently sobbing the next. Calm, turbulence, and laughter are recurring themes throughout. 

Her children struggle to see that she receives the best medical care while hoping, in spite of her condition, that she makes it to her 90th birthday. LaBena shares valuable caregiver tips she’s learned, in the form of “lessons” throughout the book as well messages of faith in the form of beloved biblical passages. Believers and non-believers alike can benefit from reading this story. 


About the Author

LaBena Fleming was born in Detroit, Michigan, raised in Ravenna, Ohio, and presently resides in Richmond Heights, Ohio with her husband. LaBena received her bachelor’s degree in Human Resources Development from Notre Dame College of Ohio. She went on to earn master’s degrees in Education and Educational Administration from Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, Ohio. A former insurance industry professional, school teacher/administrator, and community education and outreach coordinator for an organ and tissue procurement organization, LaBena retired from her position as Provider Relations Manager/Community Outreach and Education Coordinator with Hospice of the Western Reserve in 2017. Retiring afforded LaBena the opportunity to serve as one of the caregivers for her mother, who had Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. 

LaBena currently enjoys spending time with her husband, daughters, and granddaughter, public speaking, gardening, cooking, traveling, reading, and of course writing. Although she has always “dabbled” in writing; having written multiple poems and freelancing for a few greeting card companies, I Love You Always is her first book. 

Contact Links 

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

LinkedIn

Purchase Links 

Amazon



RABT Book Tours & PR

#ReleaseBlitz “I Love You Always” by LaBena Fleming

tour banner

One Family’s Alzheimer’s/Dementia Journey

and the Lessons Learned Along the Way

Nonfiction

Date Published: July 10, 2020

photo add-to-goodreads-button_zpsc7b3c634.png

I Love You Always introduces you to Lottie Mae Polk Berry, a self-proclaimed badass who battles Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia for years, hoping to make it to age 90. Her daughter, LaBena, gives a detailed account of Lottie’s life from her teenage years, through diagnosis and beyond. 

I Love You Always will have you on an emotional roller-coaster as Lottie’s wit and antics send you into hysterical laughter one moment and leave you silently sobbing the next. Calm, turbulence, and laughter are recurring themes throughout. 

Her children struggle to see that she receives the best medical care while hoping, in spite of her condition, that she makes it to her 90th birthday. LaBena shares valuable caregiver tips she’s learned, in the form of “lessons” throughout the book as well messages of faith in the form of beloved biblical passages. Believers and non-believers alike can benefit from reading this story. 


About the Author

LaBena Fleming was born in Detroit, Michigan, raised in Ravenna, Ohio, and presently resides in Richmond Heights, Ohio with her husband. LaBena received her bachelor’s degree in Human Resources Development from Notre Dame College of Ohio. She went on to earn master’s degrees in Education and Educational Administration from Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, Ohio. A former insurance industry professional, school teacher/administrator, and community education and outreach coordinator for an organ and tissue procurement organization, LaBena retired from her position as Provider Relations Manager/Community Outreach and Education Coordinator with Hospice of the Western Reserve in 2017. Retiring afforded LaBena the opportunity to serve as one of the caregivers for her mother, who had Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. 

LaBena currently enjoys spending time with her husband, daughters, and granddaughter, public speaking, gardening, cooking, traveling, reading, and of course writing. Although she has always “dabbled” in writing; having written multiple poems and freelancing for a few greeting card companies, I Love You Always is her first book. 

Contact Links 

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

LinkedIn

Purchase Links 

Amazon



RABT Book Tours & PR

#ReleaseBlitz “Santa: An Interview” by Meaghan Hurn


Holiday, Children’s, Family

Date Published: October 1st, 2020

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Santa: An Interview covers the tales of questions asked to and answered by Santa Claus one winter evening. In a remote northern village close to the North Pole, in a rare occasion during the holiday season Santa decided to take a break from Operation Christmas! He invited local kids and adults from all ages and backgrounds to the Fairbanks Public Library.

Santa had lovingly provided hot cocoa, snacks, blankets, pillows and a warm magical glowing fire for all in attendance. Tonight was for Santa and the families that came to share stories and ask him their questions. We’re lucky that one of the parents was a journalist for the local Fairbanks Gazette Newspaper, and by trade, always had a notebook in his back pocket. Thanks to this writer, Raymond “Ray” James, we can relive the stories and tales told that rare winter night for countless families to enjoy this holiday season.

You’ll read along as the pages of Ray’s notebook recount the stories and answers witnessed that one magical evening!


 

About the Author

In my previous aspirations, I’ve been a Luxury Celebrity Chef, Designer, Division 1 Swimmer, Musician, Artist, Event Planner, Philosopher, Author and CEO of Hurn Publications

I love loose leaf teas, I collect teacups and coffee cups, and strangely I love big soup spoons. In contrast to the big beautiful weddings I’ve designed and coordinated, my tastes run fairly simple. I watch tons of documentaries, generally anything to do with oceanography, marine biology or military history. I’m also a sucker for terrible jokes and puns. Typically, I’m reading, writing or playing music if I’m not working.

I’m also not a fan of small talk. I like to jump into the middle of a conversation and get the heart of a topic. So, feel free to reach out and start a conversation.

 

Contact Links

Website

Publisher Book Site

Facebook

Twitter

Goodreads

Pinterest

Instagram

 

Purchase Link

Amazon


G I V E A W A Y


RABT Book Tours & PR

#Featured “32 Candles: A Novel” by Ernessa T. Carter

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“32 cheers for Ernessa T. Carter! She’s created one of the freshest, funniest characters I’ve ever read….32 Candles is a charmer.”
—Carleen Brice, author of Orange Mint and Honey

32 Candles by exciting newcomer Ernessa T. Carter is the slightly twisted, utterly romantic, and deftly wry story of Davie Jones, who, if she doesn’t stand in her own way, just might get the man of her dreams.  For fans of John Hughes’s “Sixteen Candles”, 32 Candles is a fresh and fun fiction debut for every fan of romantic comedy.

AMAZON


#Excerpt “El Gringo: A Novel” by Edmond Salus

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Fiction
Date Published: January 2018
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Sonny Galas is an only child being raised by his mother-a widow—and the loving help of his grandfather, also widowed. Living in a Santa Monica apartment complex owned by ‘Grandpa’ all is well and average for this close-knit family until a certain French family come into the picture, in need of a place to rent. They soon show their colors in various ways, topping it off by slapping a suit on their patient, kind landlord. Sonny’s family sees no better option than selling their only asset-the apartments-and getting far away from their Lawyer-packing tenants. Far, as in ‘leaving the country’, and this is where their true adventure begins. South of the border becomes their new home.

From their journey through third-world narrow roads, small towns where no English is spoken, to long, hot unending desert roads and through humid coastal towns they continue toward their big city destination, Guadalajara, where their life begins and they encounter everything and everyone from kind helpers to con-artists and crazies and from strangers to good friends, both Mexican and American. From young boy to teenager, as the years pass, Sonny sees it all: his family’s ups and downs, the country’s ups and downs with its own political third-world corruption, and his own transformation from a simple boy in a new country to a growing youth, fully fluent in Spanish; a devilish yet fun-loving teenager now with roots firmly planted and sprouting happily in his new home, his new country. From the adventures and joys of boyhood with his friends and pals to the wild days through grade school, junior high and high school with the opportunities given him as a bi-lingual kid to living through the set-backs that could trouble any family-Mexican or American-even scare of the faint of heart, he takes it all in; after all, now he’s Mexican. The fiestas, the friends, the awesome busy modern streets of Guadalajara in the early Seventies to the early Eighties, Guadalajara, the country’s capital of Mariachis.

Purchase Links

Amazon 

Barnes and Noble

~~~

EXCERPTS

“I sat in the backseat, staring behind at the apartments as we took off in that little lemon of a car we had–a 1970 Ford Pinto–that gave my mother trouble at least once every  other week, to the point that even the mechanics had given up on it. In any case, we puttered off southbound toward the international border…” (chapter 3)

“At nine o’clock the very next day they came by the house, picked up Mamma, and headed straight to Peraza’s office… Peraza was Lawyer, businessman, consultant, and Godfather, all wrapped in one.” (chapter 11)

“On any given weekend they’d be playing the clubs. Little did I know they would become famous on an international scale, as the top Latin American Rock band, whose name later became Mana`!” (chapter 20)

~~~

Edmond Salus

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RABT Book Tours & PR

#Excerpt “El Gringo: A Novel” by Edmond Salus

~~~

Fiction
Date Published: January 2018
Goodreads Button

Sonny Galas is an only child being raised by his mother-a widow—and the loving help of his grandfather, also widowed. Living in a Santa Monica apartment complex owned by ‘Grandpa’ all is well and average for this close-knit family until a certain French family come into the picture, in need of a place to rent. They soon show their colors in various ways, topping it off by slapping a suit on their patient, kind landlord. Sonny’s family sees no better option than selling their only asset-the apartments-and getting far away from their Lawyer-packing tenants. Far, as in ‘leaving the country’, and this is where their true adventure begins. South of the border becomes their new home.

From their journey through third-world narrow roads, small towns where no English is spoken, to long, hot unending desert roads and through humid coastal towns they continue toward their big city destination, Guadalajara, where their life begins and they encounter everything and everyone from kind helpers to con-artists and crazies and from strangers to good friends, both Mexican and American. From young boy to teenager, as the years pass, Sonny sees it all: his family’s ups and downs, the country’s ups and downs with its own political third-world corruption, and his own transformation from a simple boy in a new country to a growing youth, fully fluent in Spanish; a devilish yet fun-loving teenager now with roots firmly planted and sprouting happily in his new home, his new country. From the adventures and joys of boyhood with his friends and pals to the wild days through grade school, junior high and high school with the opportunities given him as a bi-lingual kid to living through the set-backs that could trouble any family-Mexican or American-even scare of the faint of heart, he takes it all in; after all, now he’s Mexican. The fiestas, the friends, the awesome busy modern streets of Guadalajara in the early Seventies to the early Eighties, Guadalajara, the country’s capital of Mariachis.

Purchase Links

Amazon 

Barnes and Noble

~~~

EXCERPTS

“I sat in the backseat, staring behind at the apartments as we took off in that little lemon of a car we had–a 1970 Ford Pinto–that gave my mother trouble at least once every  other week, to the point that even the mechanics had given up on it. In any case, we puttered off southbound toward the international border…” (chapter 3)

“At nine o’clock the very next day they came by the house, picked up Mamma, and headed straight to Peraza’s office… Peraza was Lawyer, businessman, consultant, and Godfather, all wrapped in one.” (chapter 11)

“On any given weekend they’d be playing the clubs. Little did I know they would become famous on an international scale, as the top Latin American Rock band, whose name later became Mana`!” (chapter 20)

~~~

Edmond Salus

~~~

RABT Book Tours & PR

Explaining Chronic Illness to Children


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Getting diagnosed with fibromyalgia and other chronic conditions can make your regular daily activities of living very difficult. It can be extra difficult explaining these limitations our loved ones, and even more difficult to explain fibromyalgia to a child. Our kids are going to want to know, “What’s wrong with Mommy?” and “Why can’t daddy play catch with me?”

Well, the good news is, you’re not alone. There are lots of parents going through this exact thing, and there are lots of resources out there for parents with chronic illnesses like fibromyalgia. We took a look at books that explain a parent’s chronic illness to children. Some of the books are specifically for people with chronic conditions like fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue, while others are for more general illnesses.

Whichever you choose, your kids are sure to enjoy reading them, and they may help you explain to them what’s going on with you, and how they can help. And that’s a good thing.

1. Why Does Mommy Hurt? by Elizabeth M. Christy

 

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Why Does Mommy Hurt? is narrated by a little boy who is learning to understand and cope with his mom’s chronic illness. Neurologist Dr. Kent Smalley says, “This book helps open up communication about some of the most common problems for those with a chronically ill parent-child relationship, including fatigue, forgetfulness, and frustration.” Also, portions of the proceeds are donated to the National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association (NFMCPA).

2. Ravyn’s Doll by Melissa Swanson

 

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Melissa Swanson says she wrote Ravyn’s Doll after being diagnosed when her daughter was 9 years old. “I found myself always apologizing and explaining why I could not do things that I used to do. I work in a school district with elementary and middle school children. The kiddo’s (sic) have asked why I sometimes wear dark sunglasses, wear a tens unit, use ice packs/heating pads or move very slow and wince in pain. I find myself explaining not only to the students but to adults that I encounter.”

3. How Many Marbles do you Have? by Melinda Malott

 

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How Many Marbles do you Have? by Melinda Malott is another great book for explaining fibromyalgia to a child. She says, about writing the book, “I have a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a Master’s degree in community health education, but my formal education did not prepare me to explain something as complex as CFS and fibromyalgia to young children. I decided rather than try to explain something I couldn’t understand that it was best to try to help my children understand my limitations.”

4. Mommy Has to Stay in Bed by Annette Rivlin-Gutman

 

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Mommy Has To Stay In Bed is not specifically about fibromyalgia, but it can still be useful for explaining the limitations of a chronic illness to a child. The author, Annette Rivlin-Gutman was placed on bed rest during her 2nd pregnancy and was struggling to explain that to her 18 month-old daughter. So she wrote this book, because, “While on bed rest, […] she explained what was taking place to her daughter, but also recognized that it would have been helpful to have a related, illustrated and easy-to-understand children’s book.”

5. What Does Super Jonny Do When Mom Gets Sick? by Simone Colwill

 

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Another book that is not specifically about fibromyalgia, but is nonetheless good for explaining illness and hospitals to children. Simone Colwill wrote What Does Super Jonny Do When Mom Gets Sick? when she developed Chrone’s Disease and started spending lots of time in the hospital. If you find yourself visiting the hospital often, this book could be for you.

6. Mommy Can’t Dance by Katie Carone

 

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As anyone with a chronic illness like fibro will tell you, one of the toughest things to deal with is not being able to do things that you really used to enjoy doing. As Conscious Crafties writes, “It can be sad and confusing for both kids and moms when a mother is hurt or sick and can’t do all the things she used to. This simple and sweet book helps children understand limitations. It shares ideas on how kids can help, as well as activities a mom and child can still do together.”

 

The preceding article is from RedOrbit.com and posted here for sharing purposes only. For additional info, please visit their website.
Re-post from October 2017

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Fibromyalgia & Strained Relationships

Fibro Cloud

Those of us that deal with chronic pain deal with a constant reminder of our limitations. The realities of life with pain are far more complicated than most people realize. Sometimes those realities bring about actions that are not fair to others. A short temper, frustration with self or others, or depression are all ways that pain strains relationships. The only thing worse than dealing with chronic pain is doing so alone because you have pushed away your support system.

Lately, myself and others have noticed that I can be short tempered and jerky when I start hurting. I usually don’t notice that I am doing it until my wife gets mad and yells at me or storms out of the room. However, after it was brought to my attention by my wife and my family, I began to take notice of when I do it, what I say, and how it is perceived. Unfortunately, it had gotten so bad that I began to feel like a “jerk-hole” all of the time, and I am constantly reminded the pain strains relationships. The reality is that I take on too much responsibility and do not allow others to help me. The result is pain, and pain leads to treating my loved ones like crap. This is still something that I struggle with daily, but I have gotten much better at working on it. The root of the problem is my own guilt and ego. I tend to become attached to an idealized view of situations in my head. For example, if I work from home, then I SHOULD cook for my wife who had to go to the office that day. If I know how to perform a task more efficiently than another person, then I SHOULD be the one to do it. I SHOULD be able to keep the house clean. I SHOULD be able to do the grocery shopping. The problem is the SHOULD. Should represents an idealized view of the world that may not be based in reality. One thing that has helped me to give myself a break is addressing each idea with a dose of reality. “If I were not in so much pain, then I should be able to (fill in the blank), but since I am in pain, I should allow someone to help me.” I need to be ok with asking for help because my relationships are more important than my pride, ego, or predetermined ideas of what I SHOULD be able to do.

This idea leads me to the next issue: I hold myself to a higher standard than I am capable of.  Attention to detail, drive, and self-motivation are revered in our culture. These are considered desirable qualities, and they can be. However, when I place a higher level of ability on myself than I am capable of, then I am setting myself up for failure. It is “SHOULD” coming back to mess with me. Because I hold myself to this high standard, it is easy for me to become frustrated when I cannot perform at the level that I think I SHOULD be able to. This leads to me getting angry at myself and snapping at my loved ones, and I again see how pain strains relationships. Even though my frustration is rooted in my own inadequacy, my family is not able to differentiate the underlying motivations or frustrations that drive my actions. They simply see themselves as the target of my impatience. The answer to this is to make a realistic assessment of my capabilities and to give myself some grace. It is ok not to be superman or superwoman. It is ok to be realistic and honest with yourself. It is ok if you are not able to perform at the level that I used to before pain. Once I establish the parameters of my ability, then I need to limit myself and take care of myself. My family would rather have a dirty kitchen or help make dinner than be snapped at. If you have gotten into the habit of pushing yourself too hard so that your family can live a more comfortable life, then perhaps it is time for you to talk to them about the realities of your existence with chronic pain. Again, the answer is to give yourself a break. You will not help anyone by pushing yourself to the point of frustration. Giving yourself grace will help to maintain a healthy environment in your home, and avoid seeing first-hand how pain strains relationships.

Another way that chronic pain strains relationships is depression. It is easy to become discouraged and hopeless in the fight against chronic pain. Did you see what I said there? I said, “the fight against chronic pain” because that is what it is, and what it has to be. Depression is giving up and giving in to the pain. I know it is easy to get upset and think that it is easier said than done. Trust me, I have been there. It is like being at the bottom of a deep dark hole. Looking up is discouraging. Having someone tell you to suck it up and fight is infuriating because they do not understand your reality. In some sense, you would be correct. No one fully knows the reality of your pain, since pain is a subjective experience for each individual. However, as someone who has been there, I can tell you that it is possible to climb out of that hole. It is possible to change your mindset and build a stronger one. The hashtag that I have used on social media is #FightOrDie. That is the mindset that it takes to get out of that hole. Having said that, I will restate what I said above. You have to know your limitations and give yourself a break. The reality of depression is that it is just as unfair to those around you as biting their head off when they have done nothing wrong. But, more importantly, it is not fair to you to live that hollow existence. It is not fair to yourself to waste away and miss your life. If you want to take your life back, then you have to fight.

The end result of all of this is that you have to know yourself. You have to be real and clear about your limitations. You have to give yourself grace. You have to be ok with adjusting your view of yourself to make it match reality. As G.I. Joe cartoons told us in the 80s, knowing is half the battle, but knowing your limitations is not enough. You have to act on them by asking for help, resting, and taking care of yourself. Give yourself a break and stop buying into the “SHOULD” garbage. Be true to your reality, and you will find yourself in fewer situations where you witness how pain strains relationships.

 

The preceding article is from FibromyalgiaTreating.com and is posted here for sharing purposes only. No copyright infringement is intended.