#FREE “The Big Book of Christmas: 140+ authors and 400+ novels, novellas, stories, poems & carols (Kathartika™ Classics)”

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If you were looking for the definitive Christmas anthology, consider yourself lucky, because you just found it!

This book is everything you want Christmas to be — loving, warm and celebratory. Timeless and adorable, beautifully designed, “The Big Book of Christmas” is a great big stocky book — stuffed with novels, novellas, short stories, poems, carols and songs.

Inside you’ll find:

· Novels, novellas and short stories from Charles Dickens, Louisa May Alcott, Hans Christian Andersen, O. Henry, Lucy Maud Montgomery, E. T. A. Hoffmann, L. Frank Baum, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Henry Van Dyke, Oscar Wilde, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Anton Chekhov and many more!
· Poems, carols and songs from John Milton, Clement Clarke Moore, William Blake, W. B. Yeats, Rudyard Kipling, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, H. P. Lovecraft, George MacDonald, Emily Dickinson and many more!

#FREE at time of posting!

(Check price before purchasing!)

AMAZON


Bare Naked Words’ Virtual Christmas Market

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𝕎𝕙𝕒𝕥 𝕒 𝕪𝕖𝕒𝕣 2020 𝕙𝕒𝕤 𝕓𝕖𝕖𝕟!!

Authors and readers have seen all book signings cancelled, which has been a huge disappointment to all. Here at Bare Naked Words we are all about helping put the smile back on peoples faces, and bringing you an opportunity to spread your festive book cheer.
We will be holding a Virtual Christmas Market, where Authors can share their books and bookish gifts which are available for purchase over the coming weeks.
Books, gifts and treats can be purchased in our Facebook Event on the weekend of 7th and 8th November.
𝐈𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐧 𝐀𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐫 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐯𝐢𝐚 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐰:
𝑭𝒐𝒓 𝒂𝒍𝒍 𝒐𝒇 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒍𝒐𝒗𝒆𝒍𝒚 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒅𝒆𝒓𝒔 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒍𝒊𝒏𝒌 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒏𝒆𝒆𝒅 𝒊𝒔 𝒇𝒐𝒓 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒏𝒕 𝒊𝒕𝒔𝒆𝒍𝒇:
Let’s make this holiday season an amazing one and spread the love of all things books!

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“The Monster’s Best Christmas Ever” by Sarah Miller

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The Monster’s Best Christmas Ever: Children’s Bedtime story book about a boy and a girl and their friend Monster, Picture Books, Preschool Book, Kids books, Ages 3-8

by Sarah Miller

Genre: Children/Holidays & Celebrations/Christmas

FREE at time of posting! Kindle Unlimited!

Allow me to introduce you to Swizzle, he’s a big green furry monster with long red and white striped hands.

Swizzle lives alone in a forest, which he doesn’t like because he’s a very friendly monster.

The problem is that the children who play in the forest and see him, always run in the opposite direction because they find him scary.All the monster wants to do is to make friends with the children; the only friends he has are the animals of the forest.

One Christmas Eve, Ben and his sister Sophie are in the forest throwing snowballs at each other when Swizzle jumps down from his tree.

What happens next is a complete surprise to the furry monster; the children end up playing snow angels with him. They accept him as he is and see past his appearance.

  • Heartwarming christmas story.

 

  • Stunningly illustrated.

 

  • For ages 3-8 years.

 

  • Written in rhyme.

 

  • Teaches children to not always judge a book by its cover.

 

  • Includes pop-up messages.

Accompany Swizzle on his journey and experience the discovery of his best Christmas ever.

Amazon KU

 

 

“The Christmas Robot (The Little Robot Trilogy Book 2)” by Andrew Glennon

The Christmas Robot (The Little Robot Trilogy Book 2)

by Andrew Glennon

Genre: Children/Science Fiction & Fantasy/Christmas

FREE at time of posting! Kindle Unlimited!

Meet TwinKle#25. Join him for an unforgettable Christmas adventure.

What can an old robot toy know about the true magic of Christmas?

What secrets lie within TwinKle#25 and an old toy shop?

Just who is the International toy thief and what does he really want?

Explore a new exciting world as a young boy and his sister discover what Christmas is really about. From the author of The Loneliest Robot (5-star rated title), comes another warm-hearted and thrilling adventure for children of all ages!

An imaginative and moving new Christmas book for middle grade and teens (9-15) and older readers who still believe. Bursting with rich characters and beautiful illustrations – this uplifting tale is told with Christmas cheer and warmth. Discover The Christmas Robot.

Amazon KU

 

“Christmas Stories for Kids: Fun Christmas Stories and Jokes for Kids” by Uncle Amon

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Christmas Stories for Kids: Fun Christmas Stories and Jokes for Kids

by Uncle Amon

Genre: Children/Holidays

FREE at time of posting!

Perfect for reading aloud with Friends and Family!

Merry Christmas! Your child will enjoy this cute Christmas book full of fun stories and Christmas jokes. This is an excellent read for early and beginning readers with big and bright illustrations for younger readers!

These stories are great for quick bedtime stories and cute tales to be read aloud with friends and family!

  • Excellent for early and intermediate readers
  • Great for reading aloud with friends and family
  • Christmas stories and adventures about Christmas
  • Funny and Hilarious Christmas jokes & illustrations for kids

Story List:

  • Santa’s Beard
  • Christmas in the Future
  • The Middle of the Sea
  • Christmas In Orbit
  • Boxing Day?
  • Christmas Jokes

This book is especially great for traveling, waiting rooms, and reading aloud at home with family and friends.

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“The Lost Christmas Gift: (Children’s Book About Christmas, Bedtime Story, Picture Books, Ages 4-8, Preschool Books, Kids Book)” by Robert B. Grand

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The Lost Christmas Gift (Children’s Book About Christmas, Bedtime Story, Picture Books, Ages 4-8, Preschool Book, Kids Book)

by Robert B. Grand, Nika Melnik (Illustrator)

Genre: Children/People & Places/Holidays/Christmas

FREE at time of posting! Kindle Unlimited!

Just a great Christmas bedtime story for your little ones.

Let’s make this Christmas special.

“All children need to get gifts for Christmas! Dreams must come true!”

Amazon KU

 

Favorite Christmas Memories


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The holiday season is often a time of reflection for some, with hearts and minds returning to memories of Christmases past. One of my favorite Christmas memories is from the year I was ten.

Hospitalized with a non-malignant mass on my thyroid, I was one sad, little girl knowing my parents and eight siblings would celebrate the day without me. Christmas was always a loud, crazy day for my family, full of music and food, and lots of laughter, and I was going to miss it.

But when my doctor, Pedro Sevidall, arrived for his rounds on Christmas Eve, he came bearing gifts. I could go home for Christmas…from 8 AM to 5 PM. The size of the mass in my throat made speaking, swallowing and eating all major feats, but I didn’t care, I was going home for the day.

It was a great day. I’d already been in the hospital nearly two weeks at that point, so just being back home was comforting…and exhausting! I remember falling asleep several times. When my parents took me back that evening, mom said I was asleep before she could get me dressed for bed. I don’t remember that. But, I do remember waking up later when Dr. Sevidall came in for his rounds. I’d gotten a guitar for Christmas and brought it back to the hospital with me. He picked it up and started playing… and he was GOOD!

I don’t remember how long Dr. Sevidall played my guitar, but he stayed until I fell asleep again. Such a nice man.

And a great memory.


Some of my friends have shared memories and traditions from past holidays with me, and with their permission, I’m sharing them here.

Christmas is important to Italians and Catholics. As I am both, it shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone that we have several traditions that I love, some of which I can’t partake in while living so far from home, and others that (despite the distance) we can still be a part of. The ladies in my family used to shop together and bake together, and those moments of togetherness can’t be duplicated over the distance. Still, the recipes remain, and I make the same foods here for my family of four that I did in Pennsylvania with the large, extended family. I think the food helps bridge the gap. My in-laws always bake a birthday cake for Jesus and sing to him before dessert. In my family, we gather around the manger and sing to him first thing in the morning, even before presents. When we don’t make it home for the holiday, the four of us keep Christ in “Christmas” and keep our family close in our hearts by participating in those traditions. We sing “Happy Birthday” in the morning and make him a birthday cake. These are traditions that can be embraced by many or few, can be passed down for generations to come, and will always be among my fondest memories of the holiday.

Staci Troilo, Writer/Editor

Author of The Medici Protectorate series  

Most of my earliest Christmas memories centre around three things: dogs, books, and chocolate. Funnily enough, not much has changed.

I remember getting up early on Christmas morning, rushing downstairs and yelling ‘He’s been’ to my parents before scattering the floor with wrapping paper.

My Corgi watched on, panting, and with that bemused grin only dogs can do. I’m sure he was thinking ‘if I made that much mess, there’d be trouble’.

While Mum checked on the turkey that had been cooking overnight and Dad made breakfast, I’d hunt out my favourite gifts. Then I’d plonk myself on the settee, with my dog on one side, a Cadbury’s selection box on the other (yes, I’d sneak in a few chocolate buttons before breakfast – well, it was Christmas after all!) and my nose firmly planted in the book (first memories are of the Twinkle annual and it was always a hardback in those days)

While my taste in reading material changed, my love for Corgis and chocolate didn’t – I still have both today … and a Kindle full of books.

Ah, bliss!

Happy Days.

L.S. Fellows

Author of Magic O’clock, A Fictional of Dementia and Hope

Writing a post on Christmas memories isn’t the easiest thing. Not because I don’t have some to share, but because I have a crap memory on a good day. A lot of my memories are the same. The gifts and things aren’t what stand out, but instead the time with family. Having family around to for good times, laughs, and good food. That’s what makes this holiday really special.

In trying to figure out what to share, one did come to me. My first Christmas with my husband. We got married in March of 2002 and I had our first son exactly nine months later in Dec. 2002. That Christmas was special because it was my first as a married woman, my husband and I was celebrating the birth of our first son just two weeks prior. He’s from AZ, so his parents and brother flew in to spend it with us. We only had a two-bedroom townhouse at the time, but we made it work. Lack of space, and being slightly crowded is worth the family time. My mother-in-law is that “idyllic” stereotypical grandmother type so it made me happy she could sit and snuggle with her grandson and spoil her newly acquired granddaughter (I came into the relationship with a daughter). I remember my mother-in-law being so happy to go down the Barbie aisle since she had two boys.

The husband and I are coming up on 16 years of marriage. We’ve had a lot of Christmases together since then. We’ve gone out to AZ to have time with the rest of his family, and they’ve come out to GA other years. I’m from GA so my family is all here, and we usually get together and spend time at someone’s house (mostly mine) to have fun and enjoy each other. That’s what makes the holidays special. This year will make another memory. My family just suffered a loss after my aunt lost her battle with cancer. We are coming together to support each other and celebrate in a way that my aunt would have wanted.

So, there you have it. I hope you and your family have a wonderful and joyous holiday season.

Meka James

Author of Not Broken (The Happily Ever After)

I’m the youngest of ten children. The sister closest in age to me is still ten years older than me. So, by the time I was a teen, most of my siblings had moved out the house and started their own families. But, we always spent Christmas together. My greatest holiday memory isn’t of presents or food. It’s the laughter I saw on everyone’s face as we sat around the table, laughing and talking loudly. Memories of material things fade over time. Memories of special moments with those you love last forever.

Siren Allen

Author of Cinderella & the Wolf Prince

Isn’t it funny how much life changes when you become parents? Every single little selfish indulgent we hold dear, suddenly does a 180 and life is no longer about getting unnecessary greedy goodies for yourself… and it’s amazing.  I now get to be the magic maker, the bringer of joy, the giver of memories. My husband and I get to mold our children’s Christmas recollection into the kind of fun every kid dreams of (to a respectable point, of course!) So, I’m taking my favorite memory back to a mere two years ago. My son was three and my daughter was a newborn. It was the first year that my son was tall enough in his car seat, and old enough to really absorb the Aww and Magic in the Christmas lights. The small gesture of driving around and looking at lit up and decorated homes that I once blew off as a mere common thing, for the first time transformed into a memory that I’ll cling to for the rest of my life. The way my toddler’s eyes widened, and his entire face lit up, glowing from every fiber of his being will forever be seared in mind. Every year since, including this one, is still so exciting looking at Christmas lights at night, but that very year is one that stands out above the rest. It was a pivotal point in the holidays for me. A time that I’ll never forget.

Didi Oviatt, Columnist/Writer

Author of Search for Maylee

My favorite Christmas memory has to be when my father–not a dog lover–was so moved by the Christmas spirit that he came to our family room with a puppy in his arms. Misty was my off-and-on best friend and snuggle companion. I was with her for her final breaths.

Mark Goodson, Writer/Blogger

The Miracle of the Mundane

Back when I was a kid growing up in Philadelphia, I loved when Christmastime arrived. It meant my dad and I would partake in one of our favourite holiday pastimes: visiting different parts of the city and checking out the Christmas lights. Every neighborhood had its own special character: the brick Colonial townhouses in historic Old City and Society Hill rarely had multicolored flashing lights lining the roofs and windows–usually only white lights or flame-free candles in the windows; the Italian-Portuguese enclaves in South Philly went all-out with the brightest lights you could find and nativity scenes taking center stage; in our neighbourhood in West Philly, it was always go bold or go home with nearly every inch of houses covered in lights. My mom always kept our decorations more lowkey and understated. She hated when there were too many lights on a house. My favourite place to visit was Chestnut Hill in the northwestern section of the city. The trees were strung with white lights the houses all had big wreathes on the front doors and in the windows, porches were lined with lights, so they stood out in the winter darkness. And sometimes you had a glimpse of beautifully decorated Christmas trees through the windows and the scene was like something out of a movie. I used to imagine living in one of those big historic homes and inviting friends and relatives for Christmas dinner there. And after my dad and I would take these excursions around the city, we’d go to a diner for hot chocolate or eggnog milkshakes and a slice of pie. Maybe that was my favourite part, actually. Because it was nice to have my dad to myself.

Merry Christmas!

Kimberly Golden Malmgren writing as Kim Golden

Author of The Maybe… series

Two Christmas memories remain with me. The first memory happened when I was seven years old. We had just moved into a tiny house and my stepfather had lost his job. My mother told the three of us, she would get us something for Christmas after the New Year. We didn’t even have a tree. On Christmas Eve, two women came to our house with toys. I learned later they were my father’s sisters. One of my mother’s sisters had told them, I would not have anything for Christmas, so they bought toys. The second memory was Christmas Eve 1990. My son served as an acolyte at the 5 pm service, so I did not schedule him to serve the midnight service. We were lining up to process in for the midnight service when he rushed in and got into his vestments. He had taken the bus over to the church. He said it was not Christmas Eve if we were not serving together. My fifteen-year-old came to be with me when he could have stayed home and watched television. That special moment I will never forget. Gifts are given in so many ways.

Ida Louise Johnson writing as Ivy Jade

Many thanks to my friends for taking the time to share their precious memories. I hope you enjoyed them as much as I did.

And I hope you’re enjoying this Christmas Day, perhaps even looking back on your own favorite holiday memories.

And making new ones.

Merry Christmas!

‘Twas Just Before Christmas

Twas’ the Night Before Christmas…writer’s version! Stop by Staci’s and check it out!

Staci Troilo

One writer’s take on a popular holiday poem. Enjoy!


Christmas Faerie Muse

’Twas just before Christmas, ideas had been humming
Fingers clacking the keys and suffering from numbing

Time to shut down for the end of the year
Munch on a cookie, drink a cold beer

The house was so quiet because I was up late
Drafting a plot twist that just wouldn’t wait

But until January, my writing was done
I needed a break, I needed some fun

I scrolled through my playlist, found the Rat Pack
Danced to Dean Martin while making a snack

I was cutting a slice of a candied fruit torte
When I heard a soft giggle then a cynical snort

The refrigerator provided only dim light
The rest of the room was shadowed that night

I hurried to the wall, flipped up the switch
Turned and was startled. Yelled, “Son of a—“

A spritely young faerie stood on…

View original post 445 more words

Christmas Traditions


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Many of us take our yearly holiday traditions for granted for no other reason other than it’s what we know.  And change doesn’t come easy because as the saying goes, “but we’ve always done it this way!” Heaven forbid we should do something different. 😀

While most of my family members exchange gifts, my five sisters and I don’t purchase gifts for each other. Instead, we have to give up personal possessions. When we all lived closer together, we’d each set up ‘displays’ to browse. Fast forward to the present and we’re texting photos, and anything is up for grabs, from clothing, jewelry, and cologne to household goods. Our mom laughs at us… then takes from us all! We never know who will end up with what! 😀 😀 😀

Do you put up a Christmas tree? Have a white elephant gift party? Make charitable donations? Adopt members of the military? What are some of your traditions?

Below, you’ll find some of the ways our friends from around the world celebrate this time of year.


Venezuela

Flag of VenezuelaLove Christmas, but think it could be improved by a spot of roller-blading? If the answer is yes, visit Caracas, Venezuela this year. Every Christmas Eve, the city’s residents head to church in the early morning – so far, so normal – but, for reasons known only to them, they do so on roller skates.

This unique tradition is so popular that roads across the city are closed to cars so that people can skate to church in safety, before heading home for the less-than-traditional Christmas dinner of ‘tamales’ (a wrap made out of cornmeal dough and stuffed with meat, then steamed).

Colombia

Flag of ColombiaLittle Candles’ Day (Día de las Velitas) marks the start of the Christmas season across Colombia. In honor of the Virgin Mary and the Immaculate Conception, people place candles and paper lanterns in their windows, balconies and front yards.

The tradition of candles has grown, and now entire towns and cities across the country are lit up with elaborate displays. Some of the best are found in Quimbaya, where neighborhoods compete to see who can create the most impressive arrangement.

Norway

Flag of NorwayPerhaps one of the most unorthodox Christmas Eve traditions can be found in Norway, where people hide their brooms. It’s a tradition that dates back centuries to when people believed that witches and evil spirits came out on Christmas Eve looking for brooms to ride on. To this day, many people still hide their brooms in the safest place in the house to stop them from being stolen.

Ireland

Flag of IrelandChristmas for the Irish, who are Catholics, lasts from Christmas Eve to the feast of Epiphany on January 6th, which some Irish people call ‘Little Christmas’. Epiphany isn’t now widely celebrated in Ireland.

There is an old tradition that in some Irish houses (although now not many), people put a tall, thick candle on the sill of the largest window after sunset on Christmas Eve. The candle is left to burn all night and represents a welcoming light for Mary and Joseph.

Kenya

Flag of KenyaIn Kenya, Christmas is a time when families try and be with one another. Many people travel from cities, back to the villages where the main part of their family might live. (Although there are more whole big families now living in cities, so they don’t have to travel!) This is often the only time large families will see each other all year, so it is very important.

People try to be home for Christmas Eve so they can help with the Christmas preparations. Houses and churches are often decorated with colorful balloons, ribbons, paper decorations, flowers and green leaves. For a Christmas Tree, some people will have a Cyprus tree.

In cities and large towns, stores can have fake snow outside them! And there might be a Santa in the stores as well.

Spain

Flag of SpainMost people in Spain go to Midnight Mass or ‘La Misa Del Gallo’ (The Mass of the Rooster). It is called this because a rooster is supposed to have crowed the night that Jesus was born.

Most families eat their main Christmas meal on Christmas Eve before the service. The traditional Spanish Christmas dinner is ‘Pavo Trufado de Navidad’ which is Turkey stuffed with truffles (the mushrooms, not the chocolate ones!), although it’s not commonly eaten now. In Galicia (a region in north-west Spain, surrounded by water) the most popular meal for Christmas Eve and for Christmas Day is seafood. This can be all kinds of different seafood, from shellfish and mollusks to lobster and small edible crabs.

After the midnight service, one old tradition was for people to walk through the streets carrying torches, playing guitars and beating on tambourines and drums. One Spanish saying is ‘Esta Noche es Noche-Buena, Y no Es Noche de dormir’ which means ‘Tonight is the good night and it is not meant for sleeping!’

A few different languages are spoken in different regions in Spain. In Spanish Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Feliz Navidad’; in Catalan, it’s ‘Bon Nadal’; in Galician ‘Bo Nadal’; and in Basque (or Euskara in Basque) ‘Eguberri on’.

Vietnam

Flag of VietnamIn Vietnam, Christmas Eve is often more important than Christmas Day. Christmas isn’t an official public holiday and many people think it’s only a holiday for Christians.

In Ho Chi Minh City (which is the largest city in Vietnam and used to be called Saigon) people (especially young people) like to go into the city center, where there is a Catholic Cathedral. The streets are crowded with people on Christmas Eve and in the city center cars are not allowed for the night.

Happy Christmas in Vietnamese is Chuć Mưǹg Giańg Sinh. Happy/Merry Christmas in lots more languages

Also, like in France, the special Christmas Eve meal is called ‘reveillon’ and has a ‘bûche de Noël’ (a chocolate cake in the shape of a log) for dessert. Vietnamese people like to give presents of food and at Christmas, a bûche de Noël is a popular gift. Other Christmas presents aren’t very common, although some young people like to exchange Christmas cards.

It’s very hot for Santa in Vietnam and it can’t be very comfortable wearing all that velvet in a hot country! Santa is called ‘Ông già Noel’ (it means Christmas old man).

Greenland

Flag of GreenlandIn the villages of Polar Inuits, families like to visit each other and have parties. They drink coffee and eat cakes and exchange brightly wrapped parcels. Traditional presents are model sledges, a pair of polished walrus tusks, or sealskin mitts. Everyone in the village gets a gift and children go from house to house, singing songs.

On Christmas Eve, Church Services are held, and most people go to them, many in national costume. Some men wear the white anoraks which are worn on special occasions.

Christmas Trees have to be imported because no trees grow as far north as Greenland. The trees are often imported from Denmark. Trees are traditionally decorated on the evening of 23rd December. People who don’t use an imported tree might have a traditional driftwood tree decorated with heather.

Another traditional and popular decoration is to put an illuminated star in windows. There are stars in most homes and in all public buildings. Because Greenland is so far north, and within the Arctic Circle, during the winter the sun never rises! (You might get a brief glimpse over the southern mountains, but that’s it!) So, the stars help to bring some light.

In Greenland, there are two main languages spoken, Inuit/Greenlandic and Danish. In Greenlandic, Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Juullimi Pilluarit’; in Danish it is ‘Glædelig Jul’.

Greenland also claims to be the place where Santa Claus lives or at least goes for his summer holidays! He is said to have a home in the north of the country in Spraglebugten, near the town of Uummannaq!

Egypt

Flag of EgyptIn Egypt about 15% of people are Christians. They are the only part of the population who really celebrate Christmas as a religious festival. Most Egyptian Christians belong to the Coptic Orthodox Church and they have some very unique traditions for Christmas.

Christmas Day isn’t celebrated on the 25th December but on 7th January (like in Ethiopia and by some Orthodox Christians in Russia and Serbia).

The Coptic month leading to Christmas is called Kiahk. People sing special praise songs on Saturday nights before the Sunday Service.

For the 43 days before Christmas (Advent), from 25th November to 6th January, Coptic Orthodox Christians have a special fast where they basically eat a vegan diet. They don’t eat anything containing products that come from animals (including chicken, beef, milk, and eggs). This is called ‘The Holy Nativity Fast’. But if people are too weak or ill to fast properly they can be excused.

In Egypt, Santa is called Baba Noël (meaning Father Christmas). Children hope that he will climb through a window and will leave some presents! They might leave some kahk out for Baba Noël.

Nigeria

Flag of NigeriaChristmas in Nigeria is a family event, a time when lots of family members come together to celebrate and have fun. Most families, that live in cities, travel to the villages where their grandparents and older relatives live.

Many different languages are spoken in Nigeria. In Hausa Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Barka dà Kirsìmatì’; in Yoruba it’s ‘E Ku odun, e Ku iye’dun’; in Fulani it’s ‘Jabbama be salla Kirismati’; in Igbo (Ibo) ‘E keresimesi Oma’; in Ibibio ‘Idara ukapade isua’ and it’s Edo it’s ‘Iselogbe’. Happy/Merry Christmas in lots more languages.

Many families will throw Christmas parties that will last all night long on Christmas Eve! Then, on Christmas Morning, they go to church to give thanks to God. Homes and streets are often decorated. Most homes will have an artificial Christmas tree.

Children love to play with firecrackers at Christmas. The church choir may visit the church congregation in their homes to sing Christmas carols to them. Christmas cards are sent to friends and family members. Presents are exchanged amongst family members and some families may take their children dressed in new outfits to see Santa Claus.

In addition to serving turkey, a traditional Christmas meal in Nigeria may include beef, goat, sheep, ram or chicken. Other dishes might include pounded yam, jollof rice, fried rice, vegetable salad and some type of stew.


However you celebrate, have a joyous holiday!

Merry Christmas from my home to yours!

Holiday Bells

 

Compiled from WhyChristmas.com, Momondo.com, Yahoo, and Google.