“Dangerous Ground” by Susan Hunter #GuestPost

tour banner

on Tour February 17, 2020 to March 20, 2020

~~~

Take Your Spouse to Work Day—or Not

by Susan Nash

Occasionally someone will ask me what I do, and when I say that I’m a writer, they often respond with “Oh, I wish I could work at home. That must be so nice to set your own schedule and your own priorities.” To which I smile and respond, “Yes, it’s nice to have the work-in-your-pajamas option.” And it is. What I don’t usually add is that working at home carries its own challenges.

My husband Gary is in and out of the house at least half a dozen times a day: to have coffee, to attend a meeting, to go to the hardware store, to visit a friend, to talk to a neighbor, to organize a meeting, to go to the post office, to stop at the library. If an idea pops into his head, he acts on it. And he gets an amazing number of things done in a day.

I, on the other hand, spend quite a lot of time thinking before doing. But once started I like to write straight through for long periods, focused and undisturbed. I usually have plenty of time to do that, as Gary goes through his extremely extroverted rounds. However, on the occasional day when he decides to spend time working on projects at home, things are quite different for me.

This is what my day at the office is like then:

  • 9 a.m. Gary looks at a two-year-old tax return that he has come across “organizing” his files. He calls to me to come downstairs to his desk and look at the item that is disturbing him. I look. It does not disturb me. I go back to my desk.
  • 9:30 a.m. Gary sees something odd on the surface of the river. He goes out to explore. I do not see it because my blinds are closed. He asks me to video what he’s seeing. I go outside to shoot the video. I go back to my desk.
  • 10 a.m. Gary calls me downstairs to hold the tape measure for him. I do. I do not ask why, or what he is doing. That might land me in a project I want nothing to do with.
  • 10:30 a.m. Gary comes to my office to tell me we’re out of toner for the printer. I suggest he might like to run to the store to buy some. He does.
  • 11:15 a.m. Gary returns from the store. He comes to my office to tell me about a person I don’t know, who is doing something I don’t care about. Then he gives me a bouquet of flowers. This makes it harder to order him out of my office, but I do anyway.
  • 11:30 a.m. Gary calls up to me from his desk downstairs. He asks me if it’s going to snow tomorrow. I tell him I don’t know.
  • 11:35 a.m. Gary comes to my office to tell me that yes, it is going to snow tomorrow.
  • 11:36 a.m. I close my door. Loudly.
  • 11:40 a.m. Gary taps softly on my door and whispers—as though the act of speaking softly cancels out the disturbance—asking if I know where his meeting file is. I do not.
  • 11:45 a.m. I have hung a Do Not Disturb sign on the doorknob. I can hear Gary walk down the hall toward my office, then his footsteps retreating after he sees the sign. Then it is quiet. Then I hear him in the kitchen faux whistling an unrecognizable tune—making half humming, half flutey-sounding noises. Then he stops. Then he starts. Then he stops. A few minutes pass. Then he starts again.

I start laughing. Because, well, Gary. I take the sign off the door and catch up on my email instead of finishing the plot line for Book 7 in the Leah Nash Mysteries. Tomorrow is another day.

~~~

Synopsis:

Dangerous Ground by Susan Hunter A Murder Among Friends … Everyone is anxious to connect with actor Ryan Malloy when he returns to town for his 15-year high school reunion. Everyone except crime writer Leah Nash. She doesn’t have many fond memories of Himmel High’s golden boy. But it turns out she’s not the only one who isn’t a fan. Before the weekend is over, Ryan Malloy is murdered. The hard-headed but soft-hearted Leah is unwillingly drawn into investigating his death by the pleading of Ryan’s terminally ill mother. She soon discovers that Ryan’s self-absorbed journey through life trampled on the dreams of a number of people. His old girlfriend, his best friend, his own brother, a local businessman—there’s no shortage of suspects—or secrets. But the solution eludes Leah, until the past and the present collide in a dangerous confrontation that threatens one life and ends another.

Book Details:

Genre: Mystery

Published by: Himmel River Press

Publication Date: November 19, 2019

Number of Pages: 364

ISBN: 1698530994 (9781698530994)

Series: Leah Nash Mysteries, Book 6

Purchase Links: Amazon | Goodreads

~~~

Read an excerpt:

Chapter 1 I parked my bike just inside the cemetery gates. It took only a few steps down the tree-lined path for the heat and humidity of a mid-summer Wisconsin day to slide away into the cool dark shade. Overhead, the soft murmur of thousands of leaves stirring in the light breeze accompanied me as I walked slowly toward my sister’s grave. Both of my sisters are buried in the cemetery just a few miles outside of Himmel, Wisconsin. My father is as well. But today it was Annie I’d come to visit. My heart beat a little faster as I neared the gravesite. I’m not afraid of the dead. It’s the memories they leave behind that haunt me. Quiet Annie with her soft voice and big blue eyes, too shy to join the other laughing, shouting kindergarteners at recess—but the first to run over to comfort a little boy struggling not to cry on the first day. Imaginative Annie, commandeering our wide front porch as a sailing ship for her and her cat, Mr. Peoples, to travel around the world. Kind-hearted Annie, sharing her Halloween candy with me when I’m forced to surrender my own treats as penalty for talking back. Sweet, brave, compassionate, eight-year-old Annie, who ran into a burning house to save Mr. Peoples twenty-two years ago, and never came back. Over all the years since, people—my mother, my aunt, my therapist (yes, I went that route once), my best friend—have reassured me that her death wasn’t my fault, that I was just a child. But, I was older. I should have been watching over her. I should have seen her slipping back to the house after we’d all escaped. In my deep heart’s core, I can’t ever forget that. Now and then, and always on her birthday, I go to the cemetery to see her. I know that she isn’t really there. But her grave is an anchoring spot for me. I catch her up on the good, the bad, and the ugly happenings in my life. She knows what hurts me, and she knows what frightens me—secrets I don’t share with anyone else. I tell her what our mother is up to, and how others she knew in life are doing. I say all the things to her that I would if she were still here. I try to make up for the fact that I’m alive, and she isn’t. But, of course, I never can. When I’m talking to her at the cemetery, it feels as though she can really hear me. And I know that she answers. Not right there, at the grave, but later, in unexpected ways. Sometimes, I hear Annie speak to me through a chance remark a stranger makes, or a phrase that leaps out at me from a book, or a sudden flash of insight on a problem I’m wrestling with. I don’t share that belief with very many people. If I did, I might be forced to resign my membership in the Doubting Thomas Society, to which all good journalists should belong. But I can’t accept that those occurrences are just coincidental. I really can’t. So, on the anniversary of her birth, once again I sat down on the bench in front of her grave and told her how sorry I was that she had died. That I hadn’t saved her. That I still missed her. And then I told her what was really going on in the seemingly successful life of Leah Nash, former small-town reporter, current true crime author, and soon-to-be business failure. *** When I say I talk to Annie, I mean that literally. I have a one-sided, out-loud conversation with her, though only when I’m sure I’m alone. Some people already think I’m crazy. No need to give them additional proof. On this particular day, I had a serious problem weighing on my mind. Not long before, I had made what seemed, at the time, like a brilliant decision. The Himmel Times Weekly, the paper where I’d started out in journalism, and where I’d found a home again after a self-inflicted career injury, was closing. I decided to buy it. I asked a wealthy, community-minded, local attorney, Miller Caldwell, to invest with me. And then I asked a lot of other people—reporters, an editor, stringers, office and sales staff—to work very hard, for very little money, in the hope that together we could keep the Himmel Times alive. It was exhilarating at first. But it had become an increasing source of anxiety for me. Just as we were getting off the ground, Grantland County Online, a digital-only news site (and I use the term “news” loosely), had gotten a major infusion of capital and a new publisher. Now GO News, as it’s more commonly known, was kicking our butt. “The scariest thing, Annie,” I said, “is that we’re barely keeping our heads above water, while GO News keeps getting bigger. They don’t have the expenses we do—no print edition, no delivery costs, and they don’t spend a lot of staff time fact-checking. Plus, they started Tea to GO. Did you know that the cool kids say, ‘spill the tea,’ when they mean ‘what’s the gossip?’ “Tea to GO is full of ‘What married school official was seen in Milwaukee with a very attractive staff member last Thursday night? Did we say late, last Thursday night?’ That kind of garbage. It’s almost all blind items—the better to avoid lawsuits, my dear. But people are eating it up. Every time you go into the Elite Café, someone is trying to figure out who the latest gossip is about.” I paused for a bit of a wallow in self-pity. It wasn’t as if I hadn’t tried to shake things up at the Times, to get us moving ahead, but so far nothing I’d done had made much difference. “We have a good team. Miguel is much happier since he gave up the managing editor job. He really didn’t like bossing people. And Maggie McConnell is doing great in that spot. She’s got the instincts, the skills, and forty-five years in the news business behind her. If she could only spin straw out of gold, she’d be perfect. But since she can’t, we’re making do with a budget so lean it might as well be made out of turkey burger. “I gave Allie Ross—you remember, I told you about her. She’s the high school kid we’ve been using as a stringer. Anyway, I gave her a part-time job for the summer in the office. She’s doing the routine stuff, obits and inside pages copy—weddings, anniversaries, club news. She’s got promise, but she’s only fifteen. Troy, the other reporter besides Miguel, is a little bit of a suck-up—and his news judgment isn’t quite there yet. Still, he’s a hard worker. The stringers are a pretty mixed bag. “Now, here’s a twist I bet you didn’t see coming. I hired Mom to take April Nelson’s place as office manager. I know, I know, it’s a dicey move. But she’s smart, and efficient, and she gets the job done. Plus, she comes cheap. It’s been a little challenging, I admit. Remember when I used to get mad at her and say, ‘You’re not the boss of me!’ and she’d send me to my room? “Well, now I’m the boss of her, only I don’t get to send her to her room. Yes, OK, I’m not supposed to be doing the day-to-day. That’s Maggie’s job. I understand that. But I can’t just hide away in my office and write my next book if the paper is falling apart two floors below me, can I? “Everybody took a leap of faith when we reopened the Times, and everyone is putting everything they have into it. I can’t let them down. I have to find a way to keep us afloat. I just didn’t know it would be so hard, Annie.” I paused for a breath before I wrapped things up. “And then there’s Gabe. I don’t know. I like him as well—no, probably better than—anyone I’ve gone out with in a long time. He makes me laugh, and he’s really smart. And he likes strong women who speak their minds. In my experience, a lot of men don’t. So what’s the problem, right? Well, it’s not exactly a problem. It’s more that I’m afraid a problem might be coming. Lately, it feels like he’s pushing me a little, like for a commitment or something. Can’t we just enjoy each other? Can’t we just be without getting all serious, and defining things, and making plans? I don’t want to change things. That’s when things go bad, when you try to change them.” I slumped back against the bench with a sigh. Usually, when I lay everything out to Annie, it makes the issues seem a little more manageable. This time it all still felt overwhelming. Then, a voice spoke. *** Fortunately for my mental health, it wasn’t Annie’s. I turned and looked behind me. “Coop! How long have you been standing there?” I asked, trying to remember exactly what I’d said out loud. It’s not that Coop and I have major secrets. He’s my best friend, after all. Still, I don’t tell him everything I tell Annie. “Long enough,” he said with a grin that didn’t offer me much comfort. I tried to move the conversation away from my chat with Annie, particularly the Gabe part. “What are you doing here?” “Your mom said you were here. I called your cell, but it didn’t go through.” “Yeah. It’s a dead zone—pun totally intended—in the cemetery, except for the hill. What did you want?” “Nothing. I brought something for Annie.” I looked down at his right hand and saw that he carried a small pot of pink flowers. Pink was Annie’s favorite color. Tears sprang to my eyes. I quickly blinked them away. “That’s so nice. Why?” He shrugged. “I know what today is.” I’m all about keeping my tough outer shell polished, but I was so touched, I couldn’t keep up the facade. “You’re a pretty great friend, you know that?” He smiled, but he looked embarrassed, and tried to cover it by moving to put the flowers next to Annie’s headstone. “Did you really come just to put flowers on Annie’s grave?” “No, not just for Annie. I took some to Rebecca, too.” He was kneeling, positioning the flowers, with his back to me. I couldn’t see his expression. “Oh.” Rebecca had been Coop’s wife and my nemesis until she was killed last year. I wasn’t happy that Coop had lost someone he loved, but I couldn’t pretend I was sorry she was gone. She’d done everything she could to break up our twenty-year friendship and came close to succeeding. I couldn’t think of anything nice to say about her. So, I employed the Thumper rule, and didn’t say anything. Coop apparently didn’t want to get into the subject of Rebecca either, because as he stood and turned to me, he said, “I’ll walk out with you. I’ve got my truck. We can throw your bike in the back and you can ride home with me.” “Yes, please. I didn’t realize it was so hot. I just about sweated to death pedaling out here.” “Yeah, I can see that,” he said, taking in my damp, bedraggled hair, slipping from its hair clip, and the beads of moisture coalescing into a river of sweat running down the side of my forehead. “You kind of look like you just took a shower.” He sniffed the air, “Except you don’t have that shower-fresh scent.” “Shut up,” I said. “I’m a head-sweater from way back. Deal with it.” I smiled though, because there’s something very nice and very easy being with a person who really doesn’t care how you look—or in the present situation—smell. We walked together in companionable silence, until I’d decided he hadn’t heard any of my one-sided conversation with Annie. That dream died in the next minute. “So, what’s going on with you and Gabe? He’s a nice guy, Leah. You’re not getting ready to toss him overboard, too, are you?” “No. Why would you say that? And what do you mean by ‘too’?” “You really want to go there?” He cocked an eyebrow. It’s a not very funny running joke between Coop and my mother that I always find a reason to cut my romances short. “No, I don’t. I thought you didn’t believe in illegal surveillance, and what do you call lurking around cemeteries where people are having a private conversation? It’s nothing. Really.” He looked at me for a second, but all he said was, “OK.” Our conversation was cut off as a tall woman in her fifties, her hair pulled back and hanging in a long, gray braid down her back, appeared and abruptly crossed the path in front of us. “Hello, Marcy,” I said. She looked up as though surprised we were there. “Leah. Coop.” She nodded but didn’t stop to talk. We knew where she was going. To the top of the hill on which sat a small granite building that resembled an ancient Greek temple. The family mausoleum held Marcy’s grandparents, her own mother, and Marcy’s baby daughter, Robin. One day, it would hold Marcy, too. We watched in silence as she reached the building, pulled a key out of her pocket, unlocked the door, and slipped inside, like a ghost gliding through a wall. It had been sixteen years since Marcy White’s baby had died, and she still came every week. People said she brought a different book each time and read it to Robin. They said it like it was something weird, or even crazy. Not me, though. I understood why she did it. “You know what, Coop?” I asked, as we continued on down the path. “What?” “I’m calling bullshit on death.” *** Excerpt from Dangerous Ground by Susan Hunter. Copyright 2019 by Susan Hunter. Reproduced with permission from Susan Hunter. All rights reserved.  

~~~

Author Bio:

Susan Hunter Susan Hunter is a charter member of Introverts International (which meets the 12th of Never at an undisclosed location). She has worked as a reporter and managing editor, during which time she received a first place UPI award for investigative reporting and a Michigan Press Association first place award for enterprise/feature reporting. Susan has also taught composition at the college level, written advertising copy, newsletters, press releases, speeches, web copy, academic papers, and memos. Lots and lots of memos. She lives in rural Michigan with her husband Gary, who is a man of action, not words. During certain times of the day, she can be found wandering the mean streets of small-town Himmel, Wisconsin, looking for clues, stopping for a meal at the Elite Cafe, dropping off a story lead at the Himmel Times Weekly, or meeting friends for a drink at McClain’s Bar and Grill.

Catch Up With Susan Hunter On: LeahNashMysteries.com, Goodreads, BookBub, Instagram, Twitter, & Facebook

~~~

Tour Participants:

Visit these other great hosts on this tour for more great reviews, interviews, guest posts, and giveaways!

~~~

Enter To Win:

This is a rafflecopter giveaway hosted by Partners in Crime Virtual Book Tours for Susan Hunter. There will be 1 winner of one (1) Amazon.com Gift Card. The giveaway begins on February 17, 2020 and runs through March 21, 2020. Void where prohibited.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

~~~

Get More Great Reads at Partners In Crime Virtual Book Tours

#ReleaseBlitz “The Legacy Series: Book 1” by Brandyn Cross

cover

~~~

Drama
Date Published: February 18, 2020
Brandyn (Brandy) Harris, a lonely, abused, and terminally ill twelve-year-old boy builds his private virtual world outside the knowledge of his strict and abusive parents. Denied the ability to interact with other kids in his everyday life, Brandy finds refuge within the confines of the Internet in his early stages, where it appealed primarily to the outcasts, and a close group of virtual teen friends.
The Legacy offers a unique, unparalleled glimpse into the mind of abused children while this abuse is taking place amid the hysteria surrounding the Satanic Ritual Abuse Panic of the early 1990s. An outstanding page-turner, it gives you an unprecedented, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience, through first-hand, day-to-day accounts as they occur, a real-world of childhood desperation and painful secrets, a world-known by millions of children, but never openly shared with adults.
You’ll feel Brandy’s feelings, cry his tears and laugh with him on the good days as you’ll journey through the candid and honest secrets of an abusive childhood, as Brandy’s correspondences are written by kids, for kids. Thus, you’ll learn the truths kids only tell their friends, outside the inherent inhibitions derived from adult interference.
This book is the first volume in an epic book series based on real events and the writings and correspondences of a terminally ill young boy who is also enduring a life of physical, emotional and sexual abuse.

Purchase Links

Amazon

~~~

About the author:
Brandyn Cross is a multi-media artist, as an accomplished writer, recording artist, songwriter, filmmaker, and actor. 
Brandyn is the writer/producer of the major live event Jackie Evancho & Friends: We are Hope, which was also filmed for television broadcast as multiple concert specials. 
As a singer/songwriter Brandyn scored the international top 10 hits Dear Mr. Jesus and If Money Talks (It Ain’t on Speakin’ Terms With Me), and the top10 music video I Will Always Love You. He won BEST SONG at the prestigious Utah Film Festival & Awards for his composition and recording of Love Again, as featured in the television series Proper Manors.
As an actor and filmmaker, Brandyn has worked on numerous projects such as Unicorn City and The Wayshower, as well as Alienate and Being Charlie with Rob Reiner. He is presently in post-production on his feature directorial debut with the dark Emo drama, The Legacy.
Among his body of written work is the Feature Film The Legacy, currently in post-production and the recently completed Gary Coleman biography, As if I Never Existed, with Gary’s widow Shannon Price. Brandyn has optioned and produced multiple feature screenplays and has written over 100 episodes for various TV series and specials. Brandyn is presently releasing the first volumes in an epic book series, The Legacy.
Brandyn started exploring his creative gifts following a serious industrial accident that turned him into a wheelchair-bound amputee in addition to already being “high functioning” autistic. Determined to show the world that even severe obstacles can be overcome, Brandyn began developing his innate creative abilities, studying and honing his craft, until ultimately turning this ambition into a professional reality. Today, he continues this mission in earnest. 
Contact Links

~~~

RABT Book Tours & PR

#PromoTour “The Life and Times of Clyde Kennard” by Derek R. King

Title: The Life and Times of Clyde Kennard
Author: Derek R. King
Genre: US Civil Rights, African American, Black History
Release Date: October 13, 2018

In 1955, Clyde Kennard, a decorated army veteran, was forced to cut short the final year of his studies at the University of Chicago and return home to Mississippi due to family circumstances, where Kennard made the decision to complete his education. Yet still on the eve of the civil rights movement in America, Kennard’s decision would be one of the first serious attempts to integrate any public school at the college level in the state.

The Life and Times of Clyde Kennard tells the true story of Chicago University student Clyde Kennard’s efforts to complete his further education in his home state of Mississippi at Mississippi Southern College (now the University of Southern Mississippi) against the backdrop of the institutionalized social order of the times and the prevailing winds of change attempting to blow that social order away.
Author Derek R. King shares his extensive research into Kennard’s life, and he touches on the key events that shaped those times and the impact of the events on people involved on both sides of what was an extremely heated and emotive debate.
In the end, Clyde Kennard would take a nonconfrontational route to change, and as James Meredith’s admission to the University of Mississippi became more widely known at the time, Kennard became the forgotten man. But his story is an uplifting and inspiring story of perseverance, hardship, and committed determination to right wrongs, and it is a testament to the enduring legacy of the civil rights movement and its challenge to the status quo of injustice.


“Clyde Kennard’s story is one that should be told far and wide and given its rightful place alongside all other well-renowned heroes of the civil rights movement. Derek R. King has made a significant contribution to literature indeed.” – Literary Titan.

“I approached Derek King’s book on my client Clyde Kennard with scepticism. Could a white Scottish man be entrusted with the story of an unsung hero of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement?
Yes, King’s book is a revelation. Read it. Learn. Never forget.” Professor Steven A Drizin Clinical Professor of Law at the Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law in Chicago

“This book is a real page turner; it tells the story of one man’s efforts to enrol at college and the twists and turns that happened to him on the way and beyond.” Lilymay Amazon Reviewer

4
Return to Mississippi


Abandoning his degree course prematurely at the University of Chicago, as well as leaving the relative peace and security of Chicago to run the family farm in a segregated and volatile Mississippi, could not have been easy for Clyde. He remained determined to ensure this break from the routine of his studies was as short as possible and to avoid his previous years of study counting for naught. He hoped and planned to complete his degree course once the farm business was back on track, but Mississippi was a state in the grip of civil resistance and unrest with a determination to preserve segregation.


After returning to Eatonville, and still with his mother’s Baptist upbringing influence, he joined the Mary Magdalene Baptist Church in Hattiesburg, codirected their youth choir, and started the first Bible class for young people, becoming a Sunday school teacher in the process.


As a young girl, Gloria Peck was in Clyde’s Sunday school class and later remembered that he “taught his students with a firm but gentle hand, planning Christmas plays and delivering fruit baskets to every child in the area on the holidays.” 2 Viola Grant, who also worked with the youth choir, recalled that even his fellow church volunteers thought he was a bit of a “goody-goody.” 3 She added that in an effort to “corrupt” Clyde, a group of friends took him to the Embassy Club in Palmers Crossing. Although they knew Clyde did not drink, they ordered a bottle of wine and poured him a glass. But when they left at the end of the night, “that glass of wine was still there,” she said. “He was just a different sort of person.”


Clyde became good friends with his neighbor, the barrel-chested fifty-three-year-old Vernon Dahmer Sr., whose farm was only two miles from Clyde’s. Dahmer was an NAACP activist, and Clyde joined the NAACP, serving as president of the local NAACP Youth Council founded by Dahmer, who also acted as an adviser. It was through this involvement that Clyde met Medgar Evers, the NAACP’s field secretary in Mississippi, who traveled to Hattiesburg to assist in setting up an NAACP youth chapter. This was when Evers first became aware of Clyde’s NAACP youth work. There were many parallels between these two men. They were the same age, they’d grown up in rural farming families, they were World War II army veterans who had pursued further education on their return to the United States through the GI Bill, and neither was intimidated by white segregationists. 


Clyde also attended statewide NAACP meetings in Jackson, and as the pair’s relationship grew, Medgar developed an enormous respect for Clyde. “Clyde was like a brother to him,” recalled Joyce Ladner. 


Clyde mentored both Joyce and Dorie Ladner, fifteen-year-old sisters who were both members of the youth council and pupils at Earl Travillion High School. Clyde tutored Joyce in English and history, and on one occasion, he helped her write a speech on the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution. She recalled that Clyde “took his time” with Joyce and her sister, adding that “he was very patient.” 6 She graduated valedictorian of her high school, while her sister. Dorie graduated salutatorian. 


Clyde was serving on the Eatonville school board when the authorities decided to consolidate the Palmers Crossing and Eatonville Negro schools. He was incensed that the 125 black students from Eatonville had to travel eleven miles to attend classes at Palmers Crossing. To make matters worse, the Eatonville Negro students passed the all-white Eatonville school enroute to Palmers Crossing.


He joined others in circulating a petition to have the Eatonville schoolchildren attend the closest school, the all-white Eatonville school. Predictably, their petition was unsuccessful. In the segregationist world of Mississippi in 1955, regardless of the United States Supreme Court’s Brown decision, the public education system continued under the “separate but
equal” banner.


 After settling back in the Eatonville community, Clyde began to develop and expand the family farm, taking a loan to buy a plot of land in Eatonville and purchasing three thousand hens to start a chicken farm. In June, to supplement the farm’s income and earn additional funds to repay the loan, Clyde set up business as a “small gardening and handyman service,” purchasing “1 push mower, 4 power mowers, 1 wheel barrow and numerous assortment of gardening tools,” as well as a pickup truck a few months later. 


With a second source of income and the family farm set up to work in a way that would allow him to continue his studies, Clyde turned his attention to completing his degree course. Similar to the Eatonville school pupils, the nearest Negro college for Clyde was around ninety miles
away, at Jackson State College in Jackson; however, the nearest all-white college, Mississippi Southern College (MSC) in Hattiesburg, was only about five miles from the farm and around a fifteen-minute drive. With his commitments to his mother and the farm, Jackson State College, at ninety or so miles away, was not a practical option, as he wanted to finish his education close to home. To allow him to both complete his degree and run the farm, MSC was the obvious choice.


* * *


Mississippi Southern College (MSC) was approaching its fiftieth anniversary, and construction of a new library facility, at a cost of $855,000 to accommodate two hundred thousand volumes, had just been completed. 


At the time MSC was described by journalist Ronald A. Hollander as “white-columned, red bricked, broad walked and ivied, with lily pond and kissing bridge.” 9 MSC at the time was essentially a liberal arts school, and the intention of its alumni was its eventual status as a university.


The college marching band; the cheerleaders, named the Dixie Darlings; and the football and basketball teams were all white. The mascot was “Old Nat,” who rode on a horse called Son of Dixie. Old Nat took his name from former Confederate cavalry general Nathan Bedford Forrest,
who had tormented Union troops during the Civil War with lightning raids and from whom Forrest County itself took its name.


Social life at MSC was typical for the time, revolving around sports events and bus trips downtown to see the latest movies, but with curfew at 9:00 p.m. for freshmen girls. 


As with all public education in segregationist Mississippi, MSC was entirely dependent on the state for its funding; its president, William David McCain, was responsible to the state-appointed Board of Trustees of Institutions of Higher Learning; and by definition, MSC’s entire student
body of around 4,200 were white.


McCain, a former army general and “hardcore segregationist,” became the college’s president on August 18, 1955, promising to keep the campus “dusty or muddy with construction.” This driving ambition reflected the alumni’s desire to secure university status and for MSC to join the state’s other flagship schools, Ole Miss and Mississippi State University. The last thing McCain wanted under his presidency was adverse publicity from an integration attempt. Any question of threatening the whites-only tradition would adversely affect the pursuit of university status.


* * *


Clyde believed that common sense would prevail despite the political climate in Mississippi in the wake of the Brown decision and that integration would be achieved. He decided to enroll at MSC to complete his degree course while at the same time running the family farm. Unlike
Medgar Evers’s petitioners, Clyde’s enrollment was not motivated by the NAACP but simply his own desire to complete his degree course. “Clyde just wanted to finish school,” recalled Dorie Ladner. “He wasn’t trying to make a political statement.” 

While not motivated by the NAACP, as a member of its Forrest County chapter, he had discussed his intention to enroll with them. Far from any discouragement, local president J. C. Fairley and fellow member Joseph Otis actively encouraged Clyde to apply for admission. 

Derek R. King, is a poet, musician and published author. He lives in Scotland, enjoys the great outdoors, good malt whisky, art (particularly art nouveau, deco, impressionism, surrealist and contemporary periods) and photography.

You might spot him on a hill somewhere with his camera fist pumping and quietly muttering “Yes!” to himself if he captures a great image.
His poetry, which covers diverse topics, has been variously described as “emotive”, “raw”, “powerful” and “fun”, a collection of his work is being compiled.
His main work to date has been the award winning non-fiction Civil Rights era book, “The Life And Times Of Clyde Kennard”, which tells the true story of one man’s attempt to go to college in those challenging times.
Derek has written several short stories one of which, “Defying Convention“, is included in the recently published “Winter Chills” collection of short stories, which received a five-star review from literary Titan and their Gold book award this month.

HOSTED BY:

#BookTour “The Legacy Series: Book 1” by Brandyn Cross

~~~

Drama
Date Published: February 18, 2020
Brandyn (Brandy) Harris, a lonely, abused, and terminally ill twelve-year-old boy builds his private virtual world outside the knowledge of his strict and abusive parents. Denied the ability to interact with other kids in his everyday life, Brandy finds refuge within the confines of the Internet in his early stages, where it appealed primarily to the outcasts, and a close group of virtual teen friends.
The Legacy offers a unique, unparalleled glimpse into the mind of abused children while this abuse is taking place amid the hysteria surrounding the Satanic Ritual Abuse Panic of the early 1990s. An outstanding page-turner, it gives you an unprecedented, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience, through first-hand, day-to-day accounts as they occur, a real-world of childhood desperation and painful secrets, a world-known by millions of children, but never openly shared with adults.
You’ll feel Brandy’s feelings, cry his tears and laugh with him on the good days as you’ll journey through the candid and honest secrets of an abusive childhood, as Brandy’s correspondences are written by kids, for kids. Thus, you’ll learn the truths kids only tell their friends, outside the inherent inhibitions derived from adult interference.
This book is the first volume in an epic book series based on real events and the writings and correspondences of a terminally ill young boy who is also enduring a life of physical, emotional and sexual abuse.

Purchase Links

Amazon

~~~

About the author:
Brandyn Cross is a multi-media artist, as an accomplished writer, recording artist, songwriter, filmmaker, and actor. 
Brandyn is the writer/producer of the major live event Jackie Evancho & Friends: We are Hope, which was also filmed for television broadcast as multiple concert specials. 
As a singer/songwriter Brandyn scored the international top 10 hits Dear Mr. Jesus and If Money Talks (It Ain’t on Speakin’ Terms With Me), and the top10 music video I Will Always Love You. He won BEST SONG at the prestigious Utah Film Festival & Awards for his composition and recording of Love Again, as featured in the television series Proper Manors.
As an actor and filmmaker, Brandyn has worked on numerous projects such as Unicorn City and The Wayshower, as well as Alienate and Being Charlie with Rob Reiner. He is presently in post-production on his feature directorial debut with the dark Emo drama, The Legacy.
Among his body of written work is the Feature Film The Legacy, currently in post-production and the recently completed Gary Coleman biography, As if I Never Existed, with Gary’s widow Shannon Price. Brandyn has optioned and produced multiple feature screenplays and has written over 100 episodes for various TV series and specials. Brandyn is presently releasing the first volumes in an epic book series, The Legacy.
Brandyn started exploring his creative gifts following a serious industrial accident that turned him into a wheelchair-bound amputee in addition to already being “high functioning” autistic. Determined to show the world that even severe obstacles can be overcome, Brandyn began developing his innate creative abilities, studying and honing his craft, until ultimately turning this ambition into a professional reality. Today, he continues this mission in earnest. 
Contact Links

~~~

RABT Book Tours & PR

#GuestPost “Wolf: A Novel” by Herbert J. Stern, Alan A. Winter

tour banner

~~~

On Becoming A Writer

By Alan Winter

I have written five novels including my newest book WOLF which I wrote with Herbert Stern. It’s been an interesting journey getting to the point where someone like Herb, who is also a published writer, requested that I co-write a book with him. We worked incredibly well together doing deep research and meeting once a week to keep the momentum going. But the truth is that I came to writing by accident.

Many years ago, I had a “what if” situation in my personal life that was theoretical, as far as I knew, yet I was plagued by it. The only way I could purge the notion from my head was to write about it. The issue was simple: I have three sons who do not look like brothers. When people saw them together, they would comment that they can’t be brothers and that I must have taken the wrong one home from the hospital. I knew that is not the case. Even so, I began to wonder: what if someone knocked on my door one day, with a boy in tow, and said that my wife and I took the wrong child home from the hospital. Here’s yours; I want mine back.” What would I do? I challenged myself to write a story about babies switched at birth. I loved the process – but getting from writing to publication was neither simple nor easy.

After a literary agent rejected my manuscript, I realized that in order to really learn how to write I needed to take a course. That is when I discovered John Bowers who taught creative writing at Columbia. John was an editor of a magazine and had published seven highly acclaimed books. I hired him to be my private tutor.

John and I met every Monday at a coffee shop in midtown Manhattan. I had to be there promptly at 5:00 because the diner closed at six. John would teach me a lesson, I would go home to apply it, and then messenger the week’s production to John who would read it and teach a new lesson based on what I submitted that week. We did this for all twenty chapters. When we got to the end, John said we had to start all over because the first chapter had one lesson and the last chapter had twenty lessons. After one year, I had a manuscript worthy of submission. I was fortunate that a small publishing house picked it up and published Someone Else’s Son.

What I’ve learned is that the hardest part of the writing process is getting the first draft of the story written, even if chunks are discarded in the end. I liken it to a sculptor chipping away at a stone, not being certain of the shape that will emerge, even though he/she has a preconceived notion or maquette of how it should look. Many people think that once they have completed a draft, they have written a book. That is not the case. The draft makes them a writer, but the real writing comes from the editing. In my case, I love to edit and re-edit my stories until I am satisfied that they are the best they can be in story, suspense, language, grammar, and cadence.

It’s also critical to read as much as possible in the genre you’re writing in.  Given that WOLF is an historical novel, it should not be a surprise that I read mostly suspense thrillers and historical novels. I study how the authors ply their craft of writing, how they set up their stories, and how the good ones teach their readers something new in the process. Then, every so often, I read non-fiction to see how the author handles the challenge of presenting a story that is both factual yet compelling.

I’ve also learned that there’s no “right” time to start writing. Don’t over research your topic. Get a feel for it and start writing. Don’t worry about getting stuck, move past it when you do. Always start a story in the middle or at the end, never in the beginning . . . this gives you leeway to tell the backstory or have flashbacks. Know that finishing a manuscript for the first time is little more than completing a draft. Albeit, it is a great accomplishment, but it is still a draft. The real writing comes in when you rewrite and then rewrite your story again and again until you are satisfied with the finished piece.

These insights have served me well in my writing career, and I suspect that they will continue to do so on my next project — another collaboration with Herb Stern. Herb and I are in the process of writing the sequel to Wolf. It will take place from 1934-39. A third book is planned after that.

~~~

Wolf coverHistorical Fiction
Date Published:  February 11, 2020
Publisher:  Skyhorse Publishing
Goodreads Button

Perhaps no man on earth is more controversial, more hated, or more studied than Adolf Hitler. Yet many questions remain about his personal life and how he gained power. Based on extensive research, the extraordinary novel WOLF, by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter (Skyhorse Publishing; February 11, 2020), lifts the curtain so that the reader can observe through the eyes of a fictional character, how a seemingly unremarkable corporal who was denied a promotion for lack of “leadership ability” became dictator of Germany. The result is a gripping page-turner, a masterful historical novel.

The story begins in the mental ward of Pasewalk Hospital as World War I ends. A gravely ill soldier, who has lost his memory and is given the name Friedrich Richard, encounters a fellow patient: Adolf Hitler. Suffering from hysterical blindness, Hitler, also known as Wolf, becomes dependent on Friedrich for help with the simplest, day-to-day tasks. By the time Hitler’s sight returns, the two have forged an unbreakable bond.

Upon release from the hospital, Friedrich heads to Berlin to work as a nightclub bouncer, while Wolf moves to Munich where he focuses on turning a fledgling political club into what will soon become the Nazi party. After accidentally killing a man, Friedrich flees to Munich and reunites with his close friend.

Persuaded by Hitler’s convictions about how to rebuild Germany in the wake of its defeat, Friedrich joins the Nazi’s inner circle. Hitler, who in real life often played one advisor against the other – and was not one to rely on any of them – trusts the fictional Friedrich so much so, that he calls upon him to help resolve both personal and national crises that are historically accurate. Throughout the sixteen years covered in WOLF, Friedrich interacts with dozens of people who largely lived the lives the authors depict – from Hermann Göring and Joseph Goebbels to Berlin brothel-owner Kitty Schmidt and film star Lilian Harvey.

While history has painted Hitler as a man unable to forge lasting relationships, the authors’ research has uncovered that, in fact, he built many lifelong friendships. Hitler was attractive to women and had multiple affairs with young women as well as with the wealthy society matrons who backed the party. These relationships, which are portrayed in WOLF, “have been documented in numerous interviews over the course of seventy years, yet they have rarely, if ever, been reported by historians,” Stern and Winter explain.

During the course of the novel, Friedrich struggles to reconcile his loyalty to Hitler with his own rejection of the party’s anti-Semitism. He never wavers in his friendships with Jews, such as nightclub owner Max Klinghofer and police chief Bernhard Weiss. It is Friedrich who saves Weiss, the highest-ranking Jew in the German police when Goebbels orders him arrested. After this incident, Friedrich promises Weiss to remain by Hitler’s side in the hope that he can help lessen the severity of increasingly harsher laws meant to drive Jews from Germany.

WOLF is a historical novel that will satisfy history buffs and fiction fans alike. For those who want more, the authors’ meticulous research can be accessed at http://www.NotesOnWolf.com. In combination, the novel and the notes deftly answer the question: how did a nondescript man become the world’s greatest monster? This is truly a lesson that no one can afford to ignore.

 

~~~

About the Authors
Herbert J. Stern, former US attorney for the District of New Jersey, who prosecuted the mayors of Newark and Atlantic City, and served as judge of the US District Court for the District of New Jersey, is a trial lawyer. He also served as judge of the United States Court for Berlin where he presided over a hijacking trial in the occupied American Sector of West Berlin. His book about the case, Judgment in Berlin, won the 1974 Freedom Foundation Award and became a film starring Martin Sheen and Sean Penn. He also wrote Diary of a DA: The True Story of the Prosecutor Who Took on the Mob, Fought Corruption, and Won, as well as the multi-volume legal work Trying Cases to Win.
Alan A. Winter is the author of four novels, including Island Bluffs, Snowflakes in the Sahara, Someone Else’s Son, and Savior’s Day, which Kirkus selected as a Best Book of 2013. Winter graduated from Rutgers with a degree in history and has professional degrees from both New York University and Columbia, where he was an associate professor for many years. He edited an award-winning journal and has published more than twenty professional articles. Winter studied creative writing at Columbia’s Graduate School of General Studies. His screenplay, Polly, received honorable mention in the Austin Film Festival, and became the basis for Island Bluffs.
Contact Links

~~~

a Rafflecopter giveaway

~~~

Tour Host badge

#BookTour “Counting on Trust” by M. Ferguson Powers

 

tour banner

~~~

coverMystery  / Suspense
Publication date:
Print and ebook,
May 2017.
Audiobook, November 2019
Goodreads Button

~~~

In this suspense-charged, touching novel, Counting on Trust, information is stolen from a U.S. genetic engineering company (Omniprotein) by an employee promised payment by a Chinese general who wants to profit from selling the company’s technologies in the military region of China he commands.
To force quick payment the thief attacks fellow employees and threatens to continue until his money arrives. Will his next targets be: young lovers, computer geek Gabriel and gorgeous biologist Selena, who are discovering loving sex while trying to overcome post-traumatic effects of Selena’s girlhood rape.
Company president, Eleanor, who’s determined to keep some privacy and intimacy although her job’s high profile and her husband, Charley, has just had prostate cancer surgery.
Venture capitalist, John, who plans to duplicate Omniprotein’s facility in China and reunite with his ex-wife, fashion designer Ziyi, who returned to Shanghai after their only child died.
The personal stories of these couples explore how privacy, intimacy and trust are changing in our social-media age. They paint a compelling portrait of our time.

Purchase Links

eBook and Print

Amazon

Scribl

Bookmate

Libro

Downpour

Kobo

Hoopla Digital

AudioBooks

Audible coming soon

3D

~~~

Mary Furgeson PowersAbout the Author
Themes of novels by M. Ferguson Powers reflect the author’s varied interests, including preservation of the natural world and its creatures;
Challenges of building and maintaining loving relationships in a culture with decreasing respect for personal boundaries and privacy
Influences of globalization on world events and how the U. S. and other nations relate to one another
Public policy issues such as controlling the military-industrial-political complex and requiring the health care industry to be more respectful of its clients
The need for cooperation across governments, cultures, and societies to address global challenges such as climate change
Developments in business and university administration and management
Powers has taught microbiology, headed a university office of research, served as executive director of two university-business partnership programs, and co-authored two books on university administration. She has a bachelor of science degree in bacteriology from The Pennsylvania State University, a master’s in experimental psychology from George Mason University, and a doctorate in educational leadership from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul.
She lives on an island near Seattle with her husband David R. Powers and their two shelties. Her first novel, Each Unique and Fascinating, about a bullied young girl whose father has gone to war, was published in 2012.  OrcaSpeak, a novel of relationships and suspense, was published in 2013, and its prequel, Counting on Trust, was published in 2017.
Contact Links

~~~

a Rafflecopter giveaway

~~~

Tour Host Badge

#BookTour “Heart to Beat” by Brian Lima, M.D.

tour banner

~~~

coverNon Fiction / Personal Growth/Career
Date Published:   February 18, 2020
Publisher:  Clovercloft Publishing
Goodreads Button

College, medical school, and then ten years of grueling surgical training, that’s what it took for Brian Lima to become a leading heart transplant surgeon – literally able to breathe new life into critical ill patients.  Not only has Lima never shied away from a challenge, he has spent his life actively seeking them in pursuit of seemingly near-impossible goals.  In his insightful new book, HEART TO BEAT:  A Cardiac Surgeon’s Inspiring Story of Success and Overcoming Adversity—The Heart Way (Clovercroft Publishing/February 18, 2020), Dr. Lima shares his story, giving everyone – not just aspiring physicians – the tools and encouragement needed to be their best selves.

“We all have free will, and we all have a choice,” he writes.  “You can choose to live aimlessly, halfheartedly going with the flow and suppressing that inner voice, the one beckoning you to unleash your full potential and to grab the world by storm.  Or you can achieve success by committing to hard work and unceasing effort.”

In HEART TO BEAT, Dr. Lima candidly shares, often with a wry sense of humor, how this approach enabled him to reach the pinnacle of success in all of his undertakings – whether it was building the strength and skill to become a varsity football player, becoming valedictorian of his high school class, earning a scholarship to Cornell University, or winning coveted residency opportunities as he trained to become a heart surgeon.

“You don’t have to be the smartest or most talented person in the room to get ahead, just the one who wants it the most,” he writes.  Indeed, Dr. Lima credits his own achievements purely to his intense effort.  In his eminently readable, down-to-earth book, he breaks down the keys to advancing beyond your comfort zone and perceived limitations to unleash your full potential.  Dr. Lima’s powerful lessons include:

Heart Over Matter – “You, and you alone, are responsible for how much or how little you achieve in this life,” he writes.  Only when you realize that you are master of your own destiny, and refuse to allow insecurities, past experiences, and fears to limit your potential, will you realize your dreams.

Heart Of War – Complacency is your biggest adversary.  You must never cease working and bettering yourself – if you do, you will surely slide off the top of your game.  “The minute you rest on your laurels and kick your feet up, you’ve settled for defeat,” says Dr. Lima.

Kickstart My Heart – Dr. Lima explains that the “propulsive power of ambition” has been one of the most impactful forces of his life.  “Your eagerness to move ahead contributes more to your success than natural talent or being born with a silver spoon.”  Ambition is what enables people to overcome the primary hurdle to success:  self-doubt.

Till Death With My Heart – If something is truly your calling – meaningful, bigger than you, and well-intended – it is likely not going to be easy to achieve, says Dr. Lima.  For him, the rule must be “it’s all in or no win.”  Being “well-rounded” is incompatible with true excellence, he contends.

Not For the Faint of Heart – Fear of failure can disrupt the pursuit of any goal, and overcoming this fear is a monumental task that requires you to meet it head-on again and again, until you’re desensitized to its paralyzing influence.  Dr. Lima urges readers to see every moment as just that – a moment – whether they’re going for a buzzer beater in basketball or performing heart surgery.  This is what gives people the courage to take their shot at every opportunity.

The Heart Sell on Entrepreneurship – “One way or another, you have to get the word out about how great your ‘brand’ is – in other words, how great you are,” says Dr. Lima, contending that the sales mantra “always be closing” is critical to success.  He points to such key fundamentals as avoiding pigeonholes and being open to opportunities; never second-guessing yourself; continuing to invest in yourself; and using your time wisely.

In addition to the author’s compelling personal story, HEART TO BEAT also includes a fascinating look at the current technologies and medical care available to treat heart disease, along with the basics about living a heart-healthy life – straight from the mouth of one of the country’s leading heart transplant surgeons.

“There are those who choose to chase victory and to live life on their own terms, and there are those who don’t,” declares Dr. Lima.  HEART TO BEAT will help you choose the path to victory, giving you the motivation you need to achieve your dreams, whatever they may be.

~~~

EXCERPT

THE HEART WAY

An Excerpt from HEART TO BEAT:  A cardiac surgeon’s inspiring story of success and overcoming adversity—The Heart Way by Brian Lima, M.D.

What if we approached life’s challenges and setbacks just as our own hearts continuously strive to meet the demands of our bodies— unrelenting and with constant effort and action, even in dire circumstances? Rather than shying away from these obstacles or dwelling on our mistakes and misfortunes, what if we just kept methodically moving forward, onwards and upwards, without skipping a beat, focusing on what lies ahead and hell-bent on conquering what we set out to accomplish? We could affectionately refer to this strategy as “the Heart Way.”

The symbolic significance here cannot be overstated. By substituting the word “heart” for the word “hard,” we are consciously nullifying the negative connotations of any challenging or unpleasant task. In so doing, we are effectively empowering ourselves to overcome that self- sabotaging force of inertia holding us hostage and preventing us from taking the pivotal first step towards fulfilling our dreams. Substituting the word “heart” also invigorates us to persist along this quest, when the going gets tough and we’re tempted to throw in the towel. Pulling this off is admittedly much easier said than done, especially these days, where instant gratification has become everyone’s top priority and entitlement. Virtually every want and need imaginable, from food to entertainment, is just one click away. To make matters worse, glamorized stories of overnight success, celebrity, and material wealth are endlessly streamed via social media. These household names have absurdly emerged as the new role models for our youth, prompting widespread repudiation of any course of action they deem even remotely difficult or unpleasant.

But make no mistake: a number of facts still hold true, no matter how topsy-turvy the world has become. Shortsighted, get-rich-quick schemes and other vapid pursuits, driven solely by selfish desires for fame and fortune, are ultimately unfulfilling. It’s just how we’re wired— not to mention that prisons are full of convicts that opted for life in the fast lane. Our choices have consequences, and anything truly worth doing is not going to be easy. If it were easy, then everyone would do it. That’s what makes the journey special and genuinely rewarding, so there’s no use overthinking it any further. There are no shortcuts, easy ways out, or free lunches. I’ve come to find that the Heart Way is the only way.

“Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty… I have never in my life envied a human being who led an easy life. I have envied a great many people who led difficult lives and led them well.” –Theodore Roosevelt

To clarify, I’m not suggesting we all become masochistic gluttons for punishment. And neither was Theodore Roosevelt. Quite the contrary—life is about balance and moderation. There’s a time and a place for leisure, letting your guard down, celebrating small victories, and enjoying precious moments with friends and family. Likewise, there’s also a time to buckle down, to stare down your goals, and to launch headlong into battle with your obstacles, enduring all the gut-wrenching setbacks and failures along the way. By all intents and purposes, it seems the pendulum has swung disproportionately towards la-la land, following our increasingly hedonistic tendencies. This principle of balance holds universally true for both our physical and metaphorical hearts. Take, for instance, our diet. As much as I’d love to sugarcoat it, a heart- healthy diet doesn’t quite hit the spot like a nice juicy steak or a heaping bowl of pasta. Every now and again, sure! I’ll allow myself the indulgence. Call it a “cheat day,” a “cheat meal,” or, more generically, “delayed gratification.” But we all know that, just as with smoking cigarettes, eating this way on a regular basis would be quite hazardous to our health.

As the diet example illustrates, there are countless, painful choices we must make for our greater good, be it for our overall health or to further our quest for success. These daily choices often entail delayed gratification, gritty determination, and willpower to forego the path of least resistance and all of its shiny distractions and temptations. For the better part of my late teens, twenties, and thirties, I sacrificed tirelessly to stay on course. I kept my eyes on the prize. When my counterparts were out partying, clubbing, or sleeping in, I was chipping away at my dream, one assignment at a time, class after class, semester after semester, year after year. Had I not invested this time and effort, I can assure you I would have never become the heart surgeon, or that man, that I am today.

No one is born with the heart of a world-class cyclist or marathon runner. No one is born a master chess player, a concert pianist, or a Superbowl MVP. I wasn’t born being able to do heart surgery. What’s the common denominator? It’s a process. You must be willing to relentlessly and repeatedly push yourself well beyond your comfort zone and skill set. It’s all about the reps, the “10,000-hour rule,” as we’ll get into. That’s the story of my life, and that’s what this book is all about. That’s how I became heart to beat!

Excerpted with permission from HEART TO BEAT:  A Cardiac Surgeon’s Inspiring Story of Success and Overcoming Adversity—The Heart Way. Published by Clovercroft Publishing.  Copyright (c) 2020.  All rights reserved.

 

Purchase Links

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

~~~

About the Author
Dr. Brian Lima is a cardiac surgeon, associate professor of surgery, and recognized authority in advanced heart failure.  He has published nearly 80 articles in peer-reviewed medical journals and presented at numerous national and international medical conferences.  As the surgical director of heart transplantation at North Shore University Hospital, Dr. Lima helped launch the first and only heart transplant program on Long Island.  Dr. Lima completed his undergraduate studies at Cornell University and was awarded a Dean’s Full Tuition scholarship to attend Duke University School of Medicine.  During medical school, Dr. Lima spent a year at Harvard Medical School’s Transplantation Biology Research Center as a Stanley Sarnoff cardiovascular research fellow.  He then completed his general surgery residency training at Duke University Medical Center, and subsequent heart surgery training at The Cleveland Clinic, where he was awarded the prestigious Dr. Charles H. Bryan Annual Clinical Excellence Award in Cardiovascular Surgery.
Contact Links

~~~

a Rafflecopter giveaway

~~~

Tour Host Badge