Celebrate National Reading Month – Read with Me! #SignUp

March is National Reading Month and I invite you to “Read with Me” and share your love of reading by:

  1. Create a post about reading. Why do you read? Who taught you to read? Where is your favorite reading spot? What do you read? What is your favorite book? Who is your favorite book character? Or a topic about reading that is unique to YOU!
  2. Include the supplied banner/button on your blog sidebar for the month of March.
  3. Share your link on social networks and/or in your subscriber newsletter.
  4. Consider doing a giveaway of your favorite ebook to a random commenter. (NOT A REQUIREMENT – just a suggestion!)

There is a selection of buttons and banners below. Please forgive my meager artistic ability. Be sure to include one in your sidebar menu and link it back to the landing page. (Link found at bottom of signup page under the signup link!) If you don’t link back, visitors will NOT be able to “hop” from your blog to the next one!

If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, please coment below or message me on Twitter (@MsFelicia) or Instagram (@fle_d)!

 


Use the link below to access the Linky tools signup! (New browser will open) It will be easier for blog visitors if you sign up using the URL link directly to your reading post! If you choose to use your main URL, PLEASE make sure a link to your special post on reading is prominently posted!

 

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Celebrate National Reading Month – Read with Me! #SignUp

March is National Reading Month and I invite you to “Read with Me” and share your love of reading by:

  1. Create a post about reading. Why do you read? Who taught you to read? Where is your favorite reading spot? What do you read? What is your favorite book? Who is your favorite book character? Or a topic about reading that is unique to YOU!
  2. Include the supplied banner/button on your blog sidebar for the month of March.
  3. Share your link on social networks and/or in your subscriber newsletter.
  4. Consider doing a giveaway of your favorite ebook to a random commenter. (NOT A REQUIREMENT – just a suggestion!)

There is a selection of buttons and banners below. Please forgive my meager artistic ability. Be sure to include one in your sidebar menu and link it back to the landing page. (Link found at bottom of signup page under the signup link!) If you don’t link back, visitors will NOT be able to “hop” from your blog to the next one!

If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, please coment below or message me on Twitter (@MsFelicia) or Instagram (@fle_d)!

 


Use the link below to access the Linky tools signup! (New browser will open) It will be easier for blog visitors if you sign up using the URL link directly to your reading post! If you choose to use your main URL, PLEASE make sure a link to your special post on reading is prominently posted!

 

Save

Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

March is National Reading Month! #Celebrate

Read with Me Banner

If you look inside your particular group of followers, you’ll find a culturally rich and diverse group. Authors/writers, bloggers, students, parents/grandparents, business professionals, those sharing personal experiences, many who just want to connect…the list is endless.

While we are diverse, many of us share one common interest – WE READ!Book Happiness

March is National Reading Month and I invite you to “Read with Me” and share your love of reading by:

Create a post about reading.

Book OclockWhy do you read? Who taught you to read?

Where is your favorite reading spot? What do you read?

What is your favorite book? Who is your favorite book character?

Or a topic about reading that is unique to YOU!

Include the supplied banner/button on your blog sidebar for the month of March. (Similar to the one posted above.) Biggest Book Lie

Share your link on social networks and/or in your subscriber newsletter. Consider doing a giveaway of your favorite ebook to a random commenter. (NOT A REQUIREMENT – just a suggestion!)

Blog/link signup and event banner will be posted next week! (The week of the 13th!)

books-kidnaps-you

 

 

 

(Posted memes are from all over the internet and not created by me.)

Lorraine Hansberry – Black Author #BlackHistory


 

Lorraine Hansberry
Image from Pinterest

Lorraine Hansberry was born at Provident Hospital on the South Side of Chicago on May 19, 1930. She was the youngest of Nannie Perry Hansberry and Carl Augustus Hansberry’s four children. Her father founded Lake Street Bank, one of the first banks for blacks in Chicago, and ran a successful real estate business. Her uncle was William Leo Hansberry, a scholar of African studies at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Many prominent African-American social and political leaders visited the Hansberry household during Lorraine’s childhood including sociology professor W.E.B. DuBois, poet Langston Hughes, actor and political activist Paul Robeson, musician Duke Ellington and Olympic gold medalist Jesse Owens.

Lorraine Hansberry photoDespite their middle-class status, the Hansberrys were subject to segregation. When she was 8 years old, Hansberry’s family deliberately attempted to move into a restricted neighborhood. Restrictive covenants, in which white property owners agreed not to sell to blacks, created a ghetto known as the “Black Belt” on Chicago’s South Side. Carl Hansberry, with the help of Harry H. Pace, president of the Supreme Liberty Life Insurance Company and several white realtors, secretly bought property at 413 E. 60th Street and 6140 S. Rhodes Avenue. The Hansberrys moved into the house on Rhodes Avenue in May 1937. The family was threatened by a white mob, which threw a brick through a window, narrowly missing Lorraine. The Supreme Court of Illinois upheld the legality of the restrictive covenant and forced the family to leave the house. The U.S. Supreme Court reversed the decision on a legal technicality. The result was the opening of 30 blocks of South Side Chicago to African Americans. Although the case did not argue that racially restrict covenants were unlawful, it marked the beginning of their end.

Hansberry Decision
Image from Chicago Public Library

Lorraine graduated from Englewood High School in Chicago, where she first became interested in theater. She enrolled in the University of Wisconsin but left before completing her degree. After studying painting in Chicago and Mexico, Hansberry moved to New York in 1950 to begin her career as a writer. She wrote for Paul Robeson’s Freedom, a progressive publication, which put her in contact with other literary and political mentors such as W.E.B. DuBois and Freedom editor Louis Burnham. During a protest against racial discrimination at New York University, she met Robert Nemiroff, a Jewish writer who shared her political views. They married on June 20, 1953, at the Hansberrys’ home in Chicago.

In 1956, her husband and Burt D’Lugoff wrote the hit song, “Cindy, Oh Cindy.” Its profits allowed Hansberry to quit working and devote herself to writing. She then began a play she called The Crystal Stair, from Langston Hughes’ poem “Mother to Son.” She later retitled it A Raisin in the Sun from Hughes’ poem, “Harlem: A Dream Deferred.”

A Raisin in the Sun playbillIn A Raisin in the Sun, the first play written by an African-American to be produced on Broadway, she drew upon the lives of the working-class black people who rented from her father and who went to school with her on Chicago’s South Side. She also used members of her family as inspiration for her characters. Hansberry noted similarities between Nannie Hansberry and Mama Younger and between Carl Hansberry and Big Walter. Walter Lee, Jr. and Ruth are composites of Hansberry’s brothers, their wives, and her sister, Mamie. In an interview, Hansberry laughingly said, “Beneatha is me, eight years ago.”

Her second play, The Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window, about a Jewish intellectual, ran on Broadway for 101 performances. It received mixed reviews. Her friends rallied to keep the play running. It closed on January 12, 1965, the day Hansberry died of cancer at age 35.

Although Hansberry and Nemiroff divorced before her death, he remained dedicated to her work. As literary executor, he edited and published her three unfinished plays: Les Blancs, The Drinking Gourd and What Use Are Flowers? He also collected Hansberry’s unpublished writings, speeches, and journal entries and presented them in the autobiographical montage To Be Young, Gifted and Black. The title is taken from a speech given by Hansberry in May 1964 to winners of a United Negro Fund writing competition: “…though it be thrilling and marvelous thing to be merely young and gifted in such times, it is doubly so, doubly dynamic, to be young, gifted and black!

Young, Gifted, and Black

From Chicago Public Library

 

Walter Mosley – Black Author #BlackHistory


 

Walter Mosley
Image from Amazon

In 2010, there was a debate in academic literary circles as to whether Walter Mosley’s work should be considered Jewish literature. A similar debate has occurred as to whether he should be described as a black author, given his status as a best-selling writer. Mosley has said that he prefers to be called a novelist. He explains his desire to write about “black male heroes” saying “hardly anybody in America has written about black male heroes… There are black male protagonists and black male supporting characters, but nobody else writes about black male heroes.”

Mosley was born in California in 1952. His mother, Ella was Jewish and worked as a personnel clerk; her ancestors had immigrated from Russia. His father, Leroy Mosley, was an African-American from Louisiana who was a supervising custodian at a Los Angeles public school. He had worked as a clerk in the segregated US army during the Second World War. His parents tried to marry in 1951 but, though the union was legal in California where they were living, no one would give them a marriage license.

Mosley says that he identifies as both African-American and Jewish, with strong feelings for both groups.

He was an only child and ascribes his writing imagination to “an emptiness in my childhood that I filled up with fantasies”. When he was 12, his parents moved from South Central to more comfortably affluent, working-class west LA. He graduated from Alexander Hamilton High School in 1970. Mosley describes his father as a deep thinker and storyteller, a “black Socrates”. His mother encouraged him to read European classics from Dickens and Zola to Camus. He also loves Langston Hughes and Gabriel García Márquez. He was largely raised in a non-political family culture, although there were racial conflicts flaring throughout L.A. at the time. He later became more highly politicized and outspoken about racial inequalities in the US, which are a context of much of his fiction.

While working for Mobil Oil, Mosley took a writing course at City College in Harlem after being inspired by Alice Walker’s book, The Color Purple. One of his tutors there, Edna O’Brien, became a mentor to him and encouraged him, saying: “You’re Black, Jewish, with a poor upbringing; there are riches therein.”

Walter Mosley
Image from LA Times

Mosley started writing at 34 and has written every day since, penning more than forty books and often publishing two books a year. He has written in a variety of fiction categories, including mystery and afro-futurist science fiction, as well as non-fiction politics. His work has been translated into 21 languages. His direct inspirations include the detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, Graham Greene, and Raymond Chandler. Mosley’s fame increased in 1992 when then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton, a fan of murder mysteries, named Mosley as one of his favorite authors. Mosley made publishing history in 1997 by foregoing an advance to give the manuscript of Gone Fishin’ to a small, independent publisher, Black Classic Press in Baltimore, run by former Black Panther Paul Coates.

His first published book, Devil in a Blue Dress, was the basis of a 1995 movie starring Denzel Washington. The world premiere of his first play, The Fall of Heaven was staged at the Playhouse in the Park, Cincinnati, Ohio, in January 2010.

Mosley resides in New York City.

Devil is a Blue Dress cover

~ Walter Mosley Quote ~

“Poetry teaches us music, metaphor, condensation, and specificity.”
“I took up writing to escape the drudgery of that everyday cubicle kind of war.”
“I’ve always loved science fiction. I think the smartest writers are science fiction writers dealing with major things.”

 

Website          Amazon Author Page          Facebook

 

From Wikipedia.com

Ralph Waldo Ellison – Black Author #BlackHistory

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Image from United States Information Agency

Because we share a birthdate – March 1st – I chose Ralph Ellison as my first Black author spotlight. Ellison was born in 1913 (or 1914 – the year is disputed) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and was named after journalist and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson. Ellison’s doting father, Lewis, who loved children and read books voraciously, worked as an ice and coal deliverer. He died from a work-related accident when Ellison was only three years old.

Exploring the theme of man’s search for his identity and place in society, as seen from the perspective of the first-person narrator, Ellison’s Invisible Man, was an unnamed African American man 1930s New York City. In contrast to his contemporaries such as Richard Wright and James Baldwin, Ellison’s character was dispassionate, educated, articulate, and self-aware. Through the protagonist, Ellison explores the contrasts between the Northern and Southern varieties of racism and their alienating effect. The narrator is “invisible” in a figurative sense, in that “people refuse to see” him, and also experiences a kind of dissociation. The novel, with its treatment of taboo issues such as incest and the controversial subject of communism, won the 1953 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction (awarded for outstanding literary achievements by U.S. citizens).

Ralph Ellison
Image from Find-A-Grave

Ellison used his new fame to speak out for literature as a moral instrument. In 1955 he traveled to Europe, (where Blacks were better received and not hindered nearly as much by the racial discrimination prevalent in the U.S.) visiting and lecturing, settling for a time in Rome. In 1958, Ellison returned to the United States to take a position teaching American and Russian literature at Bard College and to begin a second novel, Juneteenth.

Ellison published Shadow and Act, a collection of essays, in 1964 and began to teach at Rutgers University and Yale University while continuing to work on his novel. The following year, a survey of 200 prominent literary figures was released that proclaimed Invisible Man the most important novel since World War II.

Writing essays about both the black experience and his love for jazz music, Ellison continued to receive major awards for his work. In 1969, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom; the following year, he was made a Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by France and became a permanent member of the faculty at New York University as the Albert Schweitzer Professor of Humanities, serving from 1970 to 1980.

In 1975, Ellison was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and his hometown of Oklahoma City honored him with the dedication of the Ralph Waldo Ellison Library. Continuing to teach, Ellison published mostly essays, and in 1984, he received the New York City College Langston Hughes Medal. The following year, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts. In 1986, his Going to the Territory was published; this is a collection of seventeen essays that included insight into southern novelist William Faulkner and Ellison’s friend Richard Wright, as well as the music of Duke Ellington and the contributions of African Americans to America’s national identity.

Ellison died on April 16, 1994, of pancreatic cancer and was interred in a crypt at Trinity Church Cemetery in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan.

On February 18, 2014, the USPS issued a 91¢ stamp honoring Ralph Ellison in its Literary Arts series.

Ellison
Image from Stamp News Now

A park, residing on 150th Street and Riverside Drive in Harlem, was dedicated to Ralph Ellison on May 1, 2003. In the park, stands a 15×8-foot bronze slab, with a “cut-out man figure” inspired by his book, “Invisible Man.”

 

Invisible Man Monument
Image from New York City Parks

Invisible Man continues to be held up as one of the most highly regarded works in the American literary canon.

 

From Wikipedia and Bio.com.

What Are You Reading (Or Writing) Online? #FreeReads

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Besides the ARCs/review copies I volunteer to read, I have a ‘few’ books I’m dying to dive into. How many is a few? Numbers aren’t important here. Dozens. Hundreds. Thousands. Are we truly counting? Do we need to? My mister tries to, but I’m just too fast for him. My TBR is so long, I really should have a librarian to keep it…and me…organized and updated.

But books, whether they are eBooks or print, are not the only things we’re reading. Many of us read online. Sites and blogs packed with exceptional poetry, prose, novellas, and full novels post daily. Online reads can enhance your website/blog by introducing new readers to your writing style…and lead you to meet new people…and make new friends. I’m only up to part five with my own online read – Free, A Novella – and have established connections and friendships with other writers and authors because of it.

Some of my favorite online reads right now are:

Thief of Dragons: The Echelonites of Cauldex (an Alternate-Earth, Erotic Sci-Fi Fantasy) by A.C. Melody (chapter 10 was just posted),

and

Flash Fiction – A Holiday Meeting (a holiday short story) by Nicole R. Locker (chapter 3 was just posted).

Blogger Simply Marquessa has several great online reads on her site, and is gearing up for 2017!

The poetry and prose by Christine Ray on Brave and Reckless is nothing short of amazing, and I cannot wait for her to update Leaving and Absence!

I recommend them all!

What are you reading (or writing) online? Feel free to post your links in the comments!

 

“Twisted (BWWM Romantic Suspense) (The Bruised Series Book 5)” by Stacy Deanne

 

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“Twisted (BWWM Romantic Suspense) (The Bruised Series Book 5)” by Stacy Deanne!

#KindleUnlimited

Amazon

Goodreads

*****

When Baltimore Detectives Lisa Swanson and Winston Lewis discover a sexually explicit profile of Dee Quarter on an online dating site, they are horrified. Dee swears the profile is fake and has no idea who’s behind the vicious attack.

Winston and Lisa think Dee’s scorned ex Grayson Paul is to blame, but Dee believes it could be the actions of a much younger admirer who won’t take no for an answer.

Lisa is happier than ever with Jake Jenson, but the arrival of a new woman in Jake’s life threatens the couple’s bliss. Lisa sets off to prove Rayne Jessup is trouble, but will realize Rayne is every bit as dangerous as she is beautiful.

Secrets are revealed and motives are discovered in the final installment of the popular Bruised Series.

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Book Buying Habits #amreading

Terry Blog

I saw this blog post about book buying habits over on DE Haggerty’s blog, who saw it at the Book Huntress and I decided it might be cathartic for me to actually write down the ridiculous amount of books I buy on a regular basis. Perhaps it will help to curtail my obsessive book buying. Or NOT!

My Book Buying Habits

Where do you buy your books from?

I was exclusively an Amazon customer for years, primarily because they were first. Then I became annoyed with Amazon’s slow-to-price-match practices and began to shop around. Now I shop everywhere, with nearly as many weekly purchases from All Romance and Evernight. (This is not going to end well, is it?)

Do you ever pre-order books and if so do you do this in store or online?

I wish I could pre-order ALL of my books, then I could unsubscribe from all newsletters and not be bombarded with ‘It’s Coming’, ‘It’s Almost Here’, ‘Are you ready for it?’ mailings. Meh. And yes, I do pre-order from book and mortar stores also.

On average, how many books do you buy a month?

50. 50 is a good number. Let’s say 50 and call it a day.

Do you use your local library?

I LOVE the library! Before we moved last year, I had a small local branch right at the corner, and visited often, even taking my own books or reader there. You cannot beat the library for ambiance!

What is your opinion on library books?

Love ’em!

How do you feel about second hand books?

I’m not understanding the question. The key word here is BOOKS. Doesn’t matter where they come from.

Do you keep your TBR pile on your main bookshelves or no?

My bookshelves ARE my TBR. The only thing I have to actually track are ARCs. If I don’t read them the minute I get them (and who does that?), they will get buried.

Do you plan to read all of the books you own?

That’s why I bought them, DUH!

What do you do with books you feel you will never read/did not enjoy?

I’m supposed to be honest, right? I delete them. End of story. If it’s a print book, I give it away. I do browse my books and re-read many from time to time. A book I didn’t enjoy has no business being on my shelf.

Have you ever donated books?

I do donate books, and it’s like giving away one of my children. But unless I want to end up on an episode of ‘Hoarders’, I couldn’t possibly keep every book. *Sadness*

Have you ever been on a book buying ban?

What’s that?

Do you feel that you buy too many books?

Ask me a serious question.

#WIPWednesday: Meet Bruce Bellamy from ‘In The Best Interest of the Child’

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A former amateur race car driver, and current owner of a successful chain of auto repair shops, Bruce Bellamy is a cousin to Rena Averest’s current caregivers. He and Olivia meet for the first time when she gives Rena a ride home from physical therapy, and he is there trying to diagnose the problem with his cousin’s car.

Bruce is instantly smitten with the attorney. Her voluptuousness pulls him right in, but it’s the guarded sadness in her eyes that propels him to get to know her. She has a beautiful smile, and he thinks she should use it more often.

The easy going business owner has been alone for nearly two decades, when his ex-wife walked away from him and their four children in search of a more affluent lifestyle. Her callous, mercenary heart caused him to close his off, and he’s not been in a relationship since, nor had any involvement with women worth mentioning, choosing instead to concentrate on raising his children and making his business successful. So when Olivia gets his attention, the entire Bellamy clan takes notice, and proceeds to help him win her over.

Having spent her adult life avoiding romantic entanglements, Olivia knows she’s walking a tight rope by allowing Bruce to get too close. Rena’s case has brought Olivia’s childhood back to the forefront of her mind, making her believe she has nothing to offer Bruce.

He seems to think otherwise.

Bruce Ambrose Bellamy
Age: 42
DOB: June 28, 1972
Place of Birth: Duluth, Minnesota
Divorced
Has four (adult) children
Owns a chain of successful auto repair shops
Loves ‘I Love Lucy’ and ‘Married with Children’ reruns
Has a BA and MA in Business earned while attending night, and online classes
Hates golfs and considers it pointless
Loves football and is a diehard Minnesota Vikings Fan