#BookBlitz “The Silent Count” by E.A. Smiroldo

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Thriller, Climate Change Fiction

Date Published: July 19, 2022

Publisher: Solstice Publishing

She’s determined to stop climate change before it’s too late…

Nuclear engineer Dara Bouldin’s life is a mess. She’s paying off her dad’s gambling debts, reeling from a broken engagement, and
practically invisible at the energy research agency where she works. Meanwhile, her ex Jericho’s latest single is racing up the charts and her handsome new colleague Dmitri is friendly with everyone but her.

All around them, wildfires, floods, and other natural disasters have become the norm. But Dara has an audacious plan to reverse climate change, if only someone would listen.

Little does she know, someone at the CIA has been paying attention. And when the public demands action, Dara gets the chance to turn her dream into reality, with the blessings of Congress and the President. Things are looking up.

That is until she discovers a secret that thrusts her into the center of a global conflict that could rewrite history, in dire ways she never intended. Things are going to change, big time. And the countdown has already begun.

Be careful what you wish for, Dara.

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Contact Links

Website

Facebook

Twitter: @EASmiroldo

Instagram: @easmiroldo

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Purchase Link

Kindle Unlimited

Amazon

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89 thoughts on “#BookBlitz “The Silent Count” by E.A. Smiroldo

    1. There are so many! Of course the old adage about never meeting your heroes might apply here, so I’ll go with this one: the late Umberto Eco. Not only were his novels brilliant, but my uncle lived in Alessandria in Italy and Umberto Eco would patronize his barber shop! He maintained that Eco was both kind and witty, so he gets my vote.

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    1. The Silent Count is my first published book! It’s been an amazing journey, but what has surprised me the most is the part of the journey that came after the writing, editing, querying, and publishing were done. Marketing, which I’m doing now, is a difficult but fun process. I’ve been blessed to have been on numerous radio shows and podcasts and have enjoyed spreading the word about my book, not to mention its theme of climate change!

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    1. There were many but nothing beats when one of my beta readers (after my last round of revisions) came back to say how much she “L-O-V-E-D” my novel. I had the confidence to send it out to publishers and agents, and happily got a contract with Solstice Publishing soon after that.

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    1. Unfortunately, no audiobook is available, but I’m considering creating one for The Silent Count as a next step. It’s expensive to produce an audiobook but hope springs eternal!

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    1. Hi! I’ve just written one, The Silent Count, so it’s my favorite by default. I have other books in mind and am writing a sequel, but I think The Silent Count will always be my favorite. I learned so much as I wrote it and it’s been a wonderful experience to see my work in print for the first time!

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    1. I wouldn’t say I hide secrets in my stories but I do make references to things that might not be obvious. For instance, the DC punk scene has many real life parallels to the Jericho Wells character and his DIY record label. Also, I mention a science fair project Dara did in high school which in full disclosure was my actual sophomore year science project. Finally, the radio shock jock was modeled on just about every shock jock I’ve ever heard!

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    1. I love authors who create indelible characters. My favorites wrote the classics: Jane Austen, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Charlotte Brontë, to name a few. We’re still talking about their novels so many years later!

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    1. Hi! I’m not partial to any particular chapter, but there are several scenes that were especially fun to write. Dara goes to a gala at the Russian embassy and is backstage at her rock star ex’s concerts a couple of times…I hope the scene descriptions give readers the feeling of being right there with her!

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    1. I hired an editor who used to be a journalist and has written 5 novels. He wasn’t cheap but completely worth it! I needed some tough love at that stage in the process and having an objective second set of eyes made a huge difference.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your question! I’m currently writing the sequel to The Silent Count which I hope to release in 2023. In the meantime, I’m also curating an anthology as part of the Green Stories Competition in collaboration with the Univeristy of Southampton. The anthology will be distributed to the delegates to the 27th United Nations Conference on Climate Change. The anthology will later be available to the public. Please look for it!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I love them both! I read all the time—not necessarily books—and write all the time—likewise, not necessarily books. Writing down my goals and making lists are how I get through life. I also love to learn, and reading is a huge part of how I do it. These activities ultimately inform my novel-writing process and spark my creativity.

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    1. I really appreciate your interest in The Silent Count! It took a long time to write — years, actually. It’s hard to say exactly how long because I was writing on and off. Months would go by where I wouldn’t write anything, and then I’d take a class or get inspired and write more. After I thought I was done, I sent version 1.0 to agents and publishers — only to be flatly rejected! I knew in my heart it wasn’t ready, so I decided to dust myself off and take action. I went through yet another couple of years of revisions via a writing group, beta readers, and a pro editor, which thankfully did the trick because my beta readers really started loving it and I found a great indie publisher (Solstice Publishing). Writing the sequel, I’ve learned my lesson. This time, I hope to just get a first draft done, as quickly as possible. The revision process is where the magic happens!

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    1. Technically I didn’t but my publisher was open to my suggestions and graciously included them in the design. I love the cover photo…it encapsulates the foreboding of climate change and hints at what’s in store!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Read a lot, not just novels but also books on writing. The library is full of them! Also, take creative writing classes. Some community colleges, community centers, or local arts organizations offer them in the evenings or on weekends, there are numerous online options, and college students can take them as electives (I was an engineering major and managed to squeeze in a couple—you don’t have to major in English or writing to benefit). Above all, it’s a craft that will improve with practice. Just dive in and write as much as you can!

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    1. Certainly, I’d love for readers to think about climate change and how we might solve the problem as a society. However, first and foremost, my novel is meant to be entertaining! My main character is a young woman with big dreams who is going through problems many can relate to—a broken heart, student loan debt, life after graduation at her first real job. Then she gets caught up in world events and the thrill ride begins!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I love coming up with titles! If I hear an interesting phrase I’ll file it away in my head for possible use as a title. Poetic turns of phrase are everywhere, just be open to them.

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    1. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen! I first read it in high school and had a whole different perspective when I reread it as an adult. I’m also obsessed with Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment and have read a few different translations. Same story with slightly different takes from each translator. In that book, you are in the murderer’s mind from the first pages until the end and it’s an amazing journey.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your question! When writing, I usually have the internet handy for research purposes and also as a quick dictionary or thesaurus. It’s a double-edged sword, though, since cat videos and recipes easily send me down a rabbit hole. My real life cat Bunny actually does help me write. She’ll cuddle next to me and purr herself to sleep. The last thing I’d want to do is disturb her relaxation, so I generally stay in place and keep writing. I probably should have thanked her in the acknowledgements of my book!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for asking! Procrastination is a big problem. I get overwhelmed and don’t know where to start, so I don’t start. The best way forward for me has always been to write using an outline. Mine are pretty loose, more a series of plot points than anything formal. If I get stuck, I skip around. Taking classes at my local writer’s center has also been helpful. Several class assignments ended up in The Silent Count!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I studied nuclear engineering in college, and the very first page of my introductory textbook said that nuclear weapons could be used for peaceful applications, such as cost effectively building harbors, extracting oil from shale, and even eliminating certain mountain ranges to improve weather patterns! That last application stuck in my craw for a long time. I thought, someone needs to use this as the premise for a crazy science fiction novel! No one did, so I decided, why not me? Of course, no one (including the textbook author) is suggesting we do this in real life! My book uses the concept satirically to show the truth about the world we live in and how technology can have unintended consequences.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hi, Nesie!

      Thanks so much for your interest in my novel. I really appreciate it. I answered the questions on your website but so far the responses have not appeared. Please let me know if there was a glitch, of if you’d like me to answer different questions.

      Again, thanks for your interest in The Silent Count!

      Best, EA Smiroldo

      Liked by 1 person

    1. My novel started out focused on plot, but once I got into the story I realized that characters are everything. Think of the classic novels from the canon…we’re still talking about Jane Eyre and Elizabeth Bennet for a reason! My main character Dara Bouldin is an introvert who makes every mistake in the book due to her inexperience, but has to get hold of herself in order save the planet. There’s definitely a focus on the plot in my novel, but so much of it depends on Dara’s growth as a character.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’d like to say Independent People by Halldor Laxness because no novel has ever made me cry so hard. It’s a story about a sheep farmer in Iceland who’s independent to a fault. There’s a scene toward the end where he reunites with his estranged daughter…it left me gutted. I suppose the novel isn’t exactly “under-appreciated” because Laxness won the Nobel Prize for Literature in the 50s. However, I didn’t have much exposure to world literature in my youth so his work was a major revelation for me.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Jane Austen 4ever! She lived in an era when women’s lives were completely limited, but still observed human nature through the lens of her brilliant imagination. She created indelible characters that we still talk about.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. As a former Meteorology major stories involving climate change are always of great interest to me. The Silent Count sounds like an excellent read and I am adding it to my TBR

    Liked by 1 person

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